would or will

Status
Not open for further replies.

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

Do you think she will go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

These sentences might be grammatically, if so please explain. What is the difference betweent he two sentences?


but will i be able to read it?
but would i be able to read it?
are these both correct? what is the difference between the two?

"do you know how would i get tutored in english?"
"do you know how will i get tutored in english?"
and same with these ones, what is the differene between the two?
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

Do you think she will go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

These sentences might be grammatically, if so please explain. What is the difference betweent he two sentences?

Both sentences are correct and they have similar meanings. Both are asking for an opinion. The first asks for more a hypothetical opinion. The second asks for more of a definitie opinion. It is likely that they would result in the same answer.


but will i be able to read it?
but would i be able to read it?
are these both correct? what is the difference between the two?

Again, "would" is little more speculative than "will". We often use "would" to be less definite than "will".

"do you know how would i get tutored in english?"
"do you know how will i get tutored in english?"
and same with these ones, what is the differene between the two?

In a question, we invert the subject and verb, but not in dependent clauses.

"Do you know how I would get tutored in english?"
"Do you know how I will get tutored in english?"

In the first, the tutoring is a hypothesis. It is not yet firm.
In the second, the tutoring is firm. The question is about the details of it.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
"Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day? "

"Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I didn't have a car on that day? "

what is the difference between the two? "didn't" and "dont"
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
"Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day? "

"Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I didn't have a car on that day? "

what is the difference between the two? "didn't" and "dont"

Didn't is past tense. It makes the lack of a car hypothertical.
Don't is present tense. It makes the lack of a car more real.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
"Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day? "
"Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I didn't have a car on that day? "

The first asks for more a hypothetical opinion. The second asks for more of a definitie opinion. It is likely that they would result in the same answer.



Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

Do you think she will go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

Didn't is past tense. It makes the lack of a car hypothertical.
Don't is present tense. It makes the lack of a car more real.



Out of those four questions, how do i know which one is appropriate to use?
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
"Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day? "
"Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I didn't have a car on that day? "

The first asks for more a hypothetical opinion. The second asks for more of a definitie opinion. It is likely that they would result in the same answer.



Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

Do you think she will go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

Didn't is past tense. It makes the lack of a car hypothertical.
Don't is present tense. It makes the lack of a car more real.



Out of those four questions, how do i know which one is appropriate to use?


First you have to identify your position about the car. If you are sure that you won't have a car, I would use "don't". If you are unsure about the availability of a car, I would use "didn't". The choice of "will" or "would" is less important, because you are seeking an opinion. In other cases, the definiteness if "will" and the uncertainty of "would" will be more important. That being said, I would use "would" with "didn't" and "will" with "don't" if there is no other information, just because it keeps definiite with definite and uncertain with uncertain.

So:

Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I didn't have a car on that day?

or

Do you think she will go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

You would choose between the two based on your view of the car possibility. :wink:
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Is it correct to say:
I would like to know when does the sun sets tonight.
I will like to know when does the sun sets tonight.
How do i know which one to use?

Is it correct to ask:
"What would this sentence mean?"
"What will this sentence mean? "
How do i know which one to use?

What does these sentences mean when i use have instead of had and vice versa?
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
Is it correct to say:
I would like to know when does the sun sets tonight.
I will like to know when does the sun sets tonight.
How do i know which one to use?

These sentences contain an indirect question, so it is no longer in question form.

I would like to know when the sun sets tonight.

That sentence uses "would" to be polite. We don't use "will" in this construction. That is future tense and out likes and wishes are normally not in the future. We could say: I want/wish to know when the sun sets tonight.


Is it correct to ask:
"What would this sentence mean?"
"What will this sentence mean? "
How do i know which one to use?

Normally we would say: What does this sentence mean? We don't use "will" this way unless we expect the meaning to change in the future. We could use "would" for politeness or presumption.

:wink:
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
Can you give me an example where i would use will?

Are these questions correct?
Can you give me an example where i would use will? <---what does this question mean if i use will?
Can you give me an example where i will use will? <----what does this question mean if i use would?

Could you give me an example where i would use will? <----what does this question mean if i use could?
Could you give me an example where i will use will? <----what does this question mean if i use "could" and "will" ?

There are so many possibilites to ask questions. How can i make it easier for myself to ask questions?

"I would like to get a new car." <what does this mean?
"I will like to get a new car." <What does this mean?




MikeNewYork:
"Normally we would say"

How did you know what to use? Like how did you know how to use would instead of will. why didn't you use "will"? again what dwould it mean if i use "will" instead of would" and vice versa?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
Can you give me an example where i would use will? <---what does this question mean if i use will?


Can you give me an example where i will use will? <----what does this question mean if i use would

'Would' is theoretical, so, as I don't know you, I'd probably use 'would'. 'Will' is not theoretical,so I could use it (in this question) about someone I know. ;-)
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
I can open the store next week. <more definite then could
I could open the store next week. <sense of probability

I think I can open the store next week. <---???
I think I could open the store next week. <---???
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I think I can open the store next week. <---???
I think I could open the store next week. <---???

The first is more likely without further context,IMO. ;-)
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
MikeNewYork:
"Normally we would say"

How did you know what to use? Like how did you know how to use would instead of will. why didn't you use "will"? again what dwould it mean if i use "will" instead of would" and vice versa?

Jack, I am a native speaker. I have been speaking only English for decades. Any language becomes more natural with practice and time. You seem to move from subject to subject. It might be better to focus on one at a time.

You have some issues with "have" and "had" and with "will" and "would". Questions are a different area, as are conditionals.

"Will" is a modal verb. We use it with another verb to form the future tense. "Will" is used in questions and statements about the future. In addition, "will" can be used for other uses, but in almost all cases, the event has not yet happened. The following is a list of uses of "will" as an auxiliary (helping) verb:

will2 (wĭl)
aux.v., Past tense would (wʊd).
Used to indicate simple futurity: They will appear later.
Used to indicate likelihood or certainty: You will regret this.
Used to indicate willingness: Will you help me with this package?
Used to indicate requirement or command: You will report to me afterward.
Used to indicate intention: I will too if I feel like it.
Used to indicate customary or habitual action: People will talk.
Used to indicate capacity or ability: This metal will not crack under heavy pressure.
Used to indicate probability or expectation: That will be the messenger ringing.


The verb "would" is another auxiliary verb and can be seen as the past tense of "will", even though this past tense might deal with events other than those that have already happened. "Would" can be more polite, less definite, more hypothetical than "will".

would (wʊd)
aux.v., Past tense of will2.
Used to express desire or intent: She said she would meet us at the corner.
Used to express a wish: Would that we had gone with you!
Used after a statement of desire, request, or advice: I wish you would stay.
Used to make a polite request: Would you go with me?
Used in the main clause of a conditional statement to express a possibility or likelihood: If I had enough money, I would buy a car. We would have gone to the beach, had the weather been good. See Usage Note at if.
Used to express presumption or expectation: That would be Steve at the door.
Used to indicate uncertainty: He would seem to be getting better.
Used to express repeated or habitual action in the past: Every morning we would walk in the garden.


Start with these two lists. Study the examples and notice how they vary from those with "will". :wink:
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
"I will go to the mall tommorow". <---simple futurity
"i would go to the mall tommorow." <--presumption

I still don't really get the uses of "will" and "would". Can't i use either one? They both works? Which one would you use and why?



Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

Do you think she will go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

"Both sentences are correct and they have similar meanings. Both are asking for an opinion. The first asks for more a hypothetical opinion. The second asks for more of a definitie opinion. It is likely that they would result in the same answer. "

Like that one for example, it doesn't matter if i use would or will? How can i make the most approriate use of it?
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
"I will go to the mall tommorow". <---simple futurity
"i would go to the mall tommorow." <--presumption

I still don't really get the uses of "will" and "would". Can't i use either one? They both works? Which one would you use and why?

The first is simple future.

The second would normally be part of a conditional.

I would go to the mall tomorrow, if got paid today.
It might stand alone in response to:

A: I can't find anybody who wants to go to the mall today.
B: I would go to the mall tomorrow (if you changed your plans).



Do you think she would go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

Do you think she will go to the mall with me if I don’t have a car on that day?

"Both sentences are correct and they have similar meanings. Both are asking for an opinion. The first asks for more a hypothetical opinion. The second asks for more of a definitie opinion. It is likely that they would result in the same answer. "

Like that one for example, it doesn't matter if i use would or will? How can i make the most approriate use of it?

Those two sentences are conditionals, because of the "if" clauses. We can use either "will" or "would" in conditionals, but usually in different tenses. Check that conditionals link I gave you.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
I would go to the mall tomorrow, if I got paid today. <--is this sentence in present tense or pass? why?

I would go to the mall tomorrow, if I get paid today. <--is the verb "get" wrong? why? and why not? if i used got, what difference does it make?
if i use "get" does it make the sentence mean that he has not get paid yet so he doesn't know yet. and if i use "got" does that he he cant go for sure? b/c he did not get paid?

If it is not wrong when would i use get or got? how do i know whiche one to use?
or should i just follow this rule "consistency of tense". like I would go to the mall tomorrow, if I got paid today. instead of I will go to the mall tomorrow, if I got paid today.




"In other cases, the definiteness if "will" and the uncertainty of "would" will be more important."

For the mall case, it would be less important on the use of would and will?

Can you give me an example of the important to uses would and will?




"For the mall case, it would be less important on the use of would and will? " <---did i say this correctly? should i use "of" instead of on? why?
 

MikeNewYork

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
jack said:
I would go to the mall tomorrow, if I got paid today. <--is this sentence in present tense or pass? why?

It is difficult to discuss "tense" in a conditional sentence, unless you call "conditional" a tense. A conditional sentence typically has two clauses. The "if" clause is usually one tense earlier than the result clause.
So, in that sentence, the "if" clause is in the past tense, and the result clause is in the present conditional (would + verb].

I would go to the mall tomorrow, if I get paid today. <--is the verb "get" wrong? why? and why not? if i used got, what difference does it make?

It isn't wrong, but it is better as "I will go to the mall tomorrow if I get paid today." That places the clauses in present tense and future conditional.

if i use "get" does it make the sentence mean that he has not get paid yet so he doesn't know yet. and if i use "got" does that he he cant go for sure? b/c he did not get paid?

The past tense "got" makes the statement hypothetical. The "get" makes it unknown at the present time.


If it is not wrong when would i use get or got? how do i know whiche one to use?
or should i just follow this rule "consistency of tense". like I would go to the mall tomorrow, if I got paid today. instead of I will go to the mall tomorrow, if I got paid today.

Especially as a beginner, you should follow the sequence of tenses. In time you will learn when you can deviate from the norm.

If I got paid today, I would go to the mall tomorrow.
If I get paid today, I will go the mall tomorrow.
 

jack

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2004
So for now, should I just follow the consitency of tense rule for sentences like "I would go to the mall tomorrow, if I get paid today. " right?

but i would like to know the difference if i used "would" instead of "will"
I would go to the mall tomorrow, if I get paid today.
I will go to the mall tomorrow, if I get paid today.

Can you also give me some examples of the important uses of would and will?




for my sentence:
[but i would like to know the difference if i used "would" instead of "will" ]
Can "used" be "use" why? and why not? what difference does it make?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top