Would you help me with a sentence

Status
Not open for further replies.

Joe

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2003
Following is an excerpt of a news report titled 'Snow pressed China to float yuan':

"We are stepping up our diplomatic efforts as well. Soon I expect to announce the appointment of a high-level emissary in Beijing who can start work in early spring," Snow told the House Financial Services Committee.

A full-scale diplomatic approach was the best path, he said. "It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region."


I don't understand the sentence in blue, especially the meaning
of 'address' here. I can only see in a dictionary that 'if you address a problem, you start trying to solve it', which seems not fit into the sentence in blue. Could you please explain the sentence or the meaning of 'address' here? Thanks very much.
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region.


address (v.) - to direct attention to an issue so as to talk about it e.g. "Let's address the issue" means, Let's talk about the issue.

:)
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
It's not exactly of non-native speaker friendly phrase, is it?
 

Joe

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2003
Thanks, Teachers. And tdol, what do you mean by that? Do you mean that 'address' is not a friendly word there?
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
The meaning is obvious to native speakers, but because most non-native speakers would be far more likely to know the postal address meaning, they might well be confused as to what it meant. ;-)
 

tigerszheng

Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2003
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
Australia
It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region.

'if you address a problem, you start trying to solve it',


I think the word "address" in this two sentence is the same meaning!

If you translate this two sentences into Chinese, you will find it's the same !

If you have any other comment, please let me know!

Thanks!
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
tigerszheng said:
It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region.

'if you address a problem, you start trying to solve it',


I think the word "address" in this two sentence is the same meaning!

If you translate this two sentences into Chinese, you will find it's the same !

If you have any other comment, please let me know!

Thanks!

I think you are right. :D

I'm glad nobody has asked about exchange rate inflexibilities. :wink:

(Say: those two sentences)

:)

[Edited to correct a misspelling.]
 

Joe

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2003
Indeed, tdol, this kind of 'unfriendly phrases' are big barriers for our ESL learners. But sometimes, we may encounter 'friendly phrases' that seem so similar in both English and Chinese that we may doubt that if they are 'Chinglish', though maybe in fact they aren't. Beside that we share some common things in our way of thinking, I think maybe that is because a lot of modern Chinese words were directly brought from other languages like English in the New Culture Movement happened in 1910s. Oh, maybe some other Chinese don't agree with me on this.

And, tigerszheng, nice to meet you here. I wonder if you put those two sentences into our mother language, what word would you use to 'replace' the word 'address'(you may type it in PinYin).
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I believe that 'long timeno see' and 'no can do'are the most common Chinglish expressions. There are also words we have borrowed from Chinese. As society becomes more international, this language exchange will grow enormously. ;-)
 

Joe

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2003
It's not exactly of non-native speaker friendly phrase, is it?

tdol, I'd like to ask some more questions. I'd never seen the sentence pattern like 'it is of +noun+adjective+noun', which is an 'unfriendly pattern' for Chinese ESL learners. Could you give me another example of this sentence pattern?

Can most native speakers accept expressions like 'long time no see' or 'no can do'? If they can, can we say that they have become 'idiomatic English'?
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
tigerszheng said:
It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region.

'if you address a problem, you start trying to solve it',


I think the word "address" in this two sentence is the same meaning!

If you translate this two sentences into Chinese, you will find it's the same !

If you have any other comment, please let me know!

Thanks!

One can also address someone i.e, direct a question or statement to them.

I believe 'solve it' refers back to 'problem', not 'address'.

:)
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Joe said:
It's not exactly of non-native speaker friendly phrase, is it?

tdol, I'd like to ask some more questions. I'd never seen the sentence pattern like 'it is of +noun+adjective+noun', which is an 'unfriendly pattern' for Chinese ESL learners. Could you give me another example of this sentence pattern?

Can most native speakers accept expressions like 'long time no see' or 'no can do'? If they can, can we say that they have become 'idiomatic English'?

Those two that you mentioned have indeed become English expressions. However, it is doubtful whether most Chinglish would ever become English.

:)
 

tigerszheng

Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2003
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
Australia
Everyone, I want to type something in Chinese!

It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region.
它也有助于在全亚太地区提出保持兑换率不变.

if you address a problem, you start trying to solve it
如果你提出问题,你应该去设法解决它.

If you can find some fault in this two sentences, please let me know!

Thanks!
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
tigerszheng said:
Everyone, I want to type something in Chinese!

It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region.
它也有助于在全亚太地区提出保持兑换率不变.

if you address a problem, you start trying to solve it
如果你提出问题,你应该去设法解决它.

If you can find some fault in this two sentences, please let me know!

Thanks!

提出 (ti2 chu1), which translates into English as to raise (an issue), to propose is fine, but English address (vb.) is best translated as 称 (cheng1): to direct consideration towards.

Hope that helps.

:D
 

Joe

Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2003
tigerszheng said:
It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region.
它也有助于在全亚太地区提出保持兑换率不变.

tigerszheng, I'd say that this translation is a bit unnatural to me.

However, I must say that it is hard for me to put it into 'perfect Chinese'. :oops:

And Casiopea, may I ask, how many languages do you know?
 

tigerszheng

Member
Joined
Dec 11, 2003
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
Australia
why do you say "this translation is a bit unnatural to me" instead of " to this sentence"?


I don't understand !
 
T

Tombraiders

Guest
My understanding of "this translation is a bit unnatural to me" suggests it's non-standard chinese.

Address has two meanings in the context: 1. direct attention to(集中精力); 2. deal with(着手解决).

Inflexibility(僵化, 一成不变), an antonym of flexibility(灵活性)。

Let me try the translation: 它也有助于着手解决整个亚洲地区兑换率一成不变的问题.
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
Tombraiders said:
My understanding of "this translation is a bit unnatural to me" suggests it's non-standard chinese.

Address has two meanings in the context: 1. direct attention to(集中精力); 2. deal with(着手解决).

Inflexibility(僵化, 一成不变), an antonym of flexibility(灵活性)。

Let me try the translation: 它也有助于着手解决整个亚洲地区兑换率一成不变的问题.

What's the gloss (i.e. direct word for word translation) for this sentence?

它也有助于着手解决整个亚洲地区 兑换率一成不变的问题.

Just curious, why did you choose 着手解决 over 集中精力?

:D
 

Casiopea

VIP Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2003
Member Type
Other
Joe said:
tigerszheng said:
It can also help address exchange-rate inflexibilities throughout the Asian region.
它也有助于在全亚太地区提出保持兑换率不变.

tigerszheng, I'd say that this translation is a bit unnatural to me.

However, I must say that it is hard for me to put it into 'perfect Chinese'. :oops:

And Casiopea, may I ask, how many languages do you know?

Not enough. :( Translation is tough, I agree. Finding just the right word is often an impossible task.

:)
 
T

Tombraiders

Guest
Casiopea said:
What's the gloss (i.e. direct word for word translation) for this sentence?

它也有助于着手解决整个亚洲地区 兑换率一成不变的问题.

Just curious, why did you choose 着手解决 over 集中精力?

:D

Well I guess I could put both in.

The purpose of "We are stepping up our diplomatic efforts" more or less suggesting putting more pressure on (集中精力) the parties refused to adjust the exchange rate accordingly. And with "A full-scale diplomatic approach was the best path" they definetly wanted to solve the problem.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top