yielding an embryo with two normal copies

GoodTaste

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Does "two normal copies" refer to "two normal MYBPC3 gene copies"(one from the egg, the other normal copy is derived from the corrected nutant version)?


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In contrast to previous human-embryo editing studies, Mitalipov’s team reported a high success rate at correcting a disease-causing mutation in a gene. The team claimed that the CRISPR–Cas9 genome editing tool was able to replace a mutant version of the MYBPC3 gene carried by sperm with a normal copy from the egg cell, yielding an embryo with two normal copies. Mitalipov’s team also introduced a healthy version of the gene along with the CRISPR machinery, but they found that the corrected embryos had shunned it for the maternal version.


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Raymott

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Yes, that's what it seems to mean, but the mutant sperm variant is not 'corrected', but replaced by a copy of the maternal gene.
 

GoodTaste

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Yes, that's what it seems to mean, but the mutant sperm variant is not 'corrected', but replaced by a copy of the maternal gene.

Is an egg deprived of such gene still a normal egg?
 

Raymott

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Well, as you know, each sperm cell and each ovum have only one of each gene. When they unite, the zygote gets two alleles of the same gene, one from each parent. So, the scientists must be copying the one gene from the ovum, leaving the original there, and putting the copied 'copy', so to speak, into the sperm.
I read the article, but it doesn't actually say this, so this is an educated guess.
 
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