You bet

Ju

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I always heard "You bet" during the conversation in English.

Sorry, I can't think of any example to refer to.
Can someone explain its usage?

Thank you.
 

Rover_KE

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It can be an emphatic way of saying 'Yes'.

'Are you looking forward to the new Premier League season?'

'You bet!'
 

SoothingDave

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It's basically saying that you could wager on an affirmative response to whatever you just asked and have a certainty of winning the wager.
 

bubbha

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It's an especially common phrase in the northern Midwest states of the US (Minnesota, Iowa, etc.).
 

Ju

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It's basically saying that you could wager on an affirmative response to whatever you just asked and have a certainty of winning the wager.

Let me try to make sentences with it.

Amber said, "Mary, do you want to win the contest?"

Mary replied, "You bet."
 

Ju

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Let me try to make sentences with it.

Amber said, "Mary, do you want to win the contest?"

Mary replied, "You bet."

Under what circumstances that we say "I bet"?
 

GoesStation

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Under what circumstances that we say "I bet"?
In American English, "I bet" as a complete sentence means "I don't believe that."

A: I can carry a piano up six flights of stairs by myself!
B: I bet! ("I don't believe it.")
 

andrewg927

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It's an especially common phrase in the northern Midwest states of the US (Minnesota, Iowa, etc.).

It is common but not overly common in the West and Southwest.
 

SoothingDave

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In American English, "I bet" as a complete sentence means "I don't believe that."

A: I can carry a piano up six flights of stairs by myself!
B: I bet! ("I don't believe it.")

I would say that the meaning (disbelief or affirmation) would depend on the tone and context. Affirmation would be more natural for me.

"After a long walk in the heat, I'm ready for an ice-cold drink."
"I bet!" (that you really are)
 

Lynxear

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It's an especially common phrase in the northern Midwest states of the US (Minnesota, Iowa, etc.).



Actually they would say "you betcha". On some American TV shows they are often made fun for saying that.
 

teechar

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Actually, they would say "you betcha". On some American TV shows, they are often made fun of for saying that.
Is that what you meant?
 

Lynxear

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I will take the "of" which I left out in my haste to write that post. But I have no idea what you find wrong with the "s" on "shows" and the "y" on "actually" which I had written in that post. Explain yourself there unless it is to add commas that I don't believe are necessary.
 

andrewg927

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It's the commas, Lynxear.
 

probus

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Actually they would say "you betcha". On some American TV shows they are often made fun for saying that.

Certainly "you betcha" is a very common variation in these parts.

But people are made fun of, not made fun.
 
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