you could take a break

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keannu

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What does this "you could take a break" mean here?
"to take a leave from school and visit your home" or something? I can't get what it implies.

20)I confess to having been a bit homesick during my first fall away from home. Students studying abroad / often feel so isolated. To those, some people who once found themselves in similar boats say, “If you are truly miserable, you could take a break.” Others advise, “Sometimes it takes a while to get used to a new place and make friends. After staying a year, you’ll think (that) you gave yourself a challenge and be certain of your decision.” So, what would you tell these students in trouble? We need comments from those who have a wealth of knowledge and experience on this matter. Please use the student council online board to let us know.
 

JMurray

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To those, some people who once found themselves in similar boats say, “If you are truly miserable, you could take a break.”

not a teacher

To "take a break" often means to make a change in your routine in order to do something different that refreshes/reinvigorates you. This could be for a very short period or something lasting much longer.
I've been so busy this morning, I need to take a break and have a strong coffee.
I take a break from my studies one night a week and go to a movie.
I had some leave entitlement so I took a break from work for a few weeks and went to the coast.

In your example I feel the suggestion is that the miserable student should leave his or her studies for a period and do something else. It may be visiting home, as you suggest, or perhaps a temporary job or some local travel – anything but studying.
 
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