you need to lower/raise dumbell upto a particular point

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Can we say someone in the gym "While performing a particular exercise you need to lower/raise dumbell upto a particular point"?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Are you or are you not talking about a specific dumbbell?

There is a preposition missing near the start. There is a comma missing inside the quote.
 

GoesStation

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
There's also a space missing between two prepositions.
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
In addition, we would not lower a dumbbell up to a particular point.


Can we say to someone in the gym "You need to lower/raise dumbbell up to a particular point"?

What else do we need to say?
 

teechar

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
Iraq
Current Location
Iraq
No, try "to ear level" instead of "till your ear".
 

Skrej

Key Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
You should raise/lift the dumbbell to (your) chest/shoulder/waist/ear/knee level.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Can we say "Bring it to your knee/ear or knee/ear level"?

Tufguy, we've told you before that your use of slash marks and your habit of putting all your suggestions inside one set of quotation marks make it very hard to make sense of what you're trying to say. Your last post suggests that someone would say all ten of those words in one sentence to someone. That would be ridiculous. I'm going to suggest, again, that you give all your suggestions in separate sentences. Here is how I would lay out your post:

Can I say the following?

1. Bring it to your knee.
2. Bring it to your ear.
3. Bring it to knee level.
4. Bring it to ear level.
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Tufguy, we've told you before that your use of slash marks and your habit of putting all your suggestions inside one set of quotation marks make it very hard to make sense of what you're trying to say. Your last post suggests that someone would say all ten of those words in one sentence to someone. That would be ridiculous. I'm going to suggest, again, that you give all your suggestions in separate sentences. Here is how I would lay out your post:

Can I say the following?

1. Bring it to your knee.
2. Bring it to your ear.
3. Bring it to knee level.
4. Bring it to ear level.

Sorry, but are these correct?
 

GoesStation

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Here is how I would lay out your post:

Can I say the following?

1. Bring it to your knee.
2. Bring it to your ear.
3. Bring it to knee level.
4. Bring it to ear level.
Numbers 3 and 4 are understandable, but it's more natural to say lift it or lower it.

Sorry, but are these correct?
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
In a gym or other exercise setting, I find "bring" OK. I have certainly heard things like "Bring the weight to shoulder height then slowly back to the starting point".
 
Top