You swish water in/around your mouth daily after brushing your teeth.

tufguy

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1) After eating something you should swish mouthful of water in/around your mouth and spit it out.
2) You swish water in/around your mouth daily after brushing your teeth.

Please check my sentences.
 
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Tarheel

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For the first, try:

After eating something you should swish a mouthful of water in your mouth and then spit it out.
 

GoesStation

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Sentence 2 is okay. You might hear both prepositions: You swish water around in your mouth every day after brushing your teeth. Well done for avoiding unnecessary words.
 

tufguy

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Sentence 2 is okay. You might hear both prepositions: You swish water around in your mouth every day after brushing your teeth. Well done for avoiding unnecessary words.

Do we need to use 'in' after 'around' as well?

You swish water around in your mouth every day after brushing your teeth.


You swish water in your mouth every day after brushing your teeth.

Are both the sentences fine?
 

GoesStation

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Are both the sentences fine?
Both sentences are possible. Can you tell me what's wrong with the question I quoted?
 

Rover_KE

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IMO, 'every day' adds nothing to the sentence.
 

tufguy

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GoesStation

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Are both sentences [strike]fine? Is it[/strike] correct?
See above. As we've said here many times, we don't ask whether something is "fine". We may say something or someone is fine when we answer a question about its status.
 

emsr2d2

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We tend only to use "fine" in positive declaratory sentences, not in the negative and not in the interrogative.

It's fine. :tick:
Is it fine? :cross:
It's not fine. :cross:
 
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