You're Welcome

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Michelle

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I am a speaker of American English. One of my pet peeves is the use of 'your welcome' in place of 'you're welcome.' Someone recently informed me that either spelling is correct in British English. I have not been able to find anything to prove or disprove that. Can anyone shed some light on this for me?

Thank you!

~Michelle
 

shane

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I'm British, and I have never used "your welcome"; nor have I seen others use it.

hth :wink:
 

RonBee

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shane said:
I'm British, and I have never used "your welcome"; nor have I seen others use it.

hth :wink:

I have seen it used. More than once. As you can imagine, I regard it as an error.
 

RonBee

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It's just "You're welcome." The other spelling is simply an error resulting from sloppiness. The word your is not a contraction for you are.
 
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Michelle

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Thanks very much, both of you. I appreciate your responses.

~Michelle
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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I've read about this usage, but have always regarded it as a homophone mistake, confusing two words that sound alike. It's definitely wrong, even if some use it. 'Your welcome' makes no sense in the context. 'You are welcome' does. 'Your welcome' would be used in a different sentence:

I'd like to thank you for your welcome and your hospitality. ;-)
 
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