Comparing Places- Comparatives Random Pelmanism Card Game

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Comparatives & Superlatives

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (108 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Comparing Places- Comparatives Random Pelmanism Card Game
Countries and nationalities vocabulary/ Comparative adjectives

Instructions for teachers
Decide which set(s) of cards you want to use with your class (countries, cities, etc) and if 
you want to include the adjectives on the cards, or not. Cut up one set of cards per group 
of two to four students, cutting off the adjective parts if you don’t want to use it. If you are 
going to let students look at the suggested phrases, also make copies of that worksheet.

Ask the groups of students to spread the cards face down across the table. One student 
turns over two cards and tries to compare those two places, e.g. 
“Paris is much bigger 
than Cologne” or “Spanish food is far more famous than Norwegian food”. If their partner 
agrees with the comparison and no one has used the same sentence before, they can 
keep those cards and score two points. You will need to decide if they have to use a 
different adjective each time, or if the same adjective with a different adverb (e.g. 
“slightly 
dirtier” after someone else has already said “much dirtier”) counts as a different sentence. 

If they can’t think of any suitable comparison, if they repeat what has been said before or if
they say something that isn’t true, they have to turn the cards back face down in the same 
places as before. 

Play then passes to the next person. Students do the same round and round their group 
until all the cards are gone or the teacher stops the game. The player with the most cards 
at the end of the game is the winner. 

To make the game easier and/ or quicker to finish, the game can also be played with the 
cards face up, either from the beginning of the game or from at some point during the 
game if it is clear the students are making few successful comparisons. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2019

1