Emailing Roleplays 2

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (92 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Emailing roleplays and brainstorming useful phrases

Roleplay email exchanges from below, saying exactly what you would write in your email. 
Continue each exchange until it comes to a natural end. The person who picked the card 
should take the role written on it, but both people can see it. 

Get back in touch with someone you haven’t contacted for a long time, e.g. an ex-boss,

university professor or friend from primary school.

Introduce yourself to someone who has no idea who you are and request something.

You want to delay the thing that your partner is requesting as long as possible.

Ask for some private information about someone.

Ask for special permission to do something that usually isn’t allowed.

Ask for feedback on a new rule. 

Offer to do something, then change your mind when you get a positive reply.

Try to fix a time to meet (for business or social purposes) as soon as possible, using your

real schedule to say when you aren’t available.

Respond to your partner’s complaint about something that you are responsible for. 

Try to thank your partner more than they thank you.

Politely decline all your partner’s invitations

Confirm things about your partner’s email before answering their questions. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Brainstorm phrases for these functions (the ones in italics above), at different levels of 
formality if possible. 
Getting back in touch 

Introducing yourself

Delaying something

Asking for information 

Giving permission

Asking for permission

Asking for feedback

Offering

Fixing a time

Complaining

Responding to complaints

Thanking

Inviting

Declining invitations

Confirming

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Emailing roleplays and brainstorming useful phrases Suggested answers
Getting back in touch 
Long time no see.
How have you been?
Sorry it’s been so long since I’ve been in touch.

Introducing yourself
My name is… and I work for…
I was given your name/ details by…
I was told that I should write to you about…

Delaying something
Can we make it…?
Can we put it back/ off until…?

Asking for information 
Could you tell/ inform me…?
I (really) need some information about…
Do you (happen) to know…?

Giving permission
That’s fine.
Please go ahead.
There’s no problem with doing that.

Asking for permission
Is it okay for me to…?/ Would it be okay for me to…?
Could I (possibly)…?

Asking for feedback
Any feedback you can give me on this would be gratefully accepted.
I look forward to reading your views on it.
Please let me know what you think. 

Offering
Would you like me to (lend a hand with)…?
I’d like to offer (you)…

Fixing a time
How about…?
Are you free/ available…?
…, if that is convenient with you.

Complaining
I wasn’t (entirely/ very) satisfied with…
Unfortunately,…
… did not match my expectations. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Responding to complaints
We were sorry to hear about your problems with…
We (deeply) regret…
We would like to apologise for…
Please accept our apologies for…
This was caused by…
To make up for this, we would like to offer you…

Thanking
Thank you (so much) for…
I am very grateful for…
I really appreciate…
… is very much appreciated.

Inviting
We’d like to invite you to…
Would you like to…?
How about… with us?

Declining invitations
I’m afraid I’m… at that time.
I would have loved to, but…
…, but please do ask me again.

Confirming
Can I check what you mean by…?
I wasn’t quite sure what you meant by….
Can you give me some more details on…?
Could you confirm…?

Roleplay email exchanges where the first email contains at least one of the phrases 
above.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013