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Thread: ask

  1. #11
    skotopes is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: ask

    Thank everyone, who help me! Your explanation helped me a lot.Means that in principle i proposed option would be understandable, but ,perhaps, not perceived as an idiom. I understand you correctly? Thanks for the correction of errors.

  2. #12
    skotopes is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: ask

    Thank everyone, who help me! Your explanation helped me a lot.Means that in principle i proposed option would be understandable, but ,perhaps, not perceived as an idiom. I understand you correctly? Thanks for the correction of errors.

  3. #13
    skotopes is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: ask

    Oh! Finally it became clear. And that the phrase "i`m interest in English"-just seemed to me that American version is more like my mother tongue method of constructing phrases! Or anything more. But now i think it`s a superficial view, and everything is more complicated. And yet,can i use my version `gunpowder in a powder flasks` for women? Because in my language it may be.:?

  4. #14
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    Default Re: ask

    It appears to be a literal translation of a Russian stock phrase. In my 64 years I have never heard it in English, nor do I expect to.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: ask

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    It appears to be a literal translation of a Russian stock phrase. In my 64 years I have never heard it in English, nor do I expect to.
    The same for me.

    Despite what several people have said, skotopes, you seem determined to use it. Go ahead. Many people may well understand you. However, as a general rule, you will sound more natural if you use expressions that are familiar to native speakers.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: ask

    You have convinced me.Thank to all

  7. #17
    skotopes is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: ask

    How to deal with translation of literary texts? Not to lose the nuances of humor?Would be understandable if native speakers of English, the phrase: `This is where such you seen so that in a live person to a knife poking?` This statement is sometimes found as an allegory.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: ask

    If you were translating a literary text, then " there is still gunpowder in his flask" is acceptable. The reader would know that this is a translation, and make the mental adjustment to understand.

    However, I have no idea what is meant by `This is where such you seen so that in a live person to a knife poking?`It's not the expression that I don't understand, but the English in which it is written. The words are English, but the sentence is not.

  9. #19
    skotopes is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: ask

    The first sentence- it is a Russian proverb. And the second is a literary quotation, which must be translated without losing the sarcastic tone. May be this:`This is where there is a view in a living person to poke a knife.` ?

  10. #20
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    Default Re: ask

    Quote Originally Posted by skotopes View Post
    The first sentence- it is a Russian proverb. And the second is a literary quotation, which must be translated without losing the sarcastic tone. May be this:`This is where there is a view in a living person to poke a knife.` ?
    I am unable to understand this.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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