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  1. #11
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Sorry about those mistakes I made. e.g PS not PA.
    etc.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    Why I say that they are both verbs is because the pass the test of changing with time -- Today I swing (shut), yesterday I swung (shut), I have swung (shut). Now, in the case of "shut", the word does not change. It is, however, still a verb.
    eg. "to shut", "shutting".
    'Swing' changes with tense and aspect - "I swing/swung, am/was swinging, have/had swung", etc, but 'shut' never changes.,

    'Shut' can indeed function as a verb. However, in this particular sentence, does it not function as an adjective? If it is a verb, then one needs to explain its form, and also to explain the difference in functions between 'shut' and the underlined words in:

    I swung the door open/to/ajar.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  3. #13
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
    Frank Antonson is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    "Shut" is in this case the past participle of the verb "to shut". Virtually all verbs as past participles can function as adjectives, i.e. modify.
    Now, there are a few verbs which do not change from present, through past, to past participle.
    "To run", for example, goes "Today I run, yesterday I ran, I have run".
    The past participle is the same as the present.
    At the moment, I can't think of any other than "to shut" that don't change at all.

    If it helps any, think of the sentence as saying that the gate swung closed.

    Frank

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    "Shut" is in this case the past participle of the verb "to shut".
    How do you know? 'to' and 'ajar' (see my last post) are clearly not verbs , and 'open', if it be a verb, is not a past participle
    5
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  5. #15
    barryashton is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Hello again Frank

    You say 'If you look them up in a dictionary, I think it will say that they are verbs, or derived from verbs.' I have looked 'shut' up in various dictionaries and they give examples of 'shut' acting as a verb and examples of 'shut' acting as an 'adjective' (and as a noun). Perhaps the best examples are given in the Merriam-Webster online (I tried to include the web address here but I have not made sufficient posts - sorry) which gives, amongst others, the following example of 'shut' acting as an adjective: The door slammed shut.

    Barry

  6. #16
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Barry,

    I agree that "shut" can be an adjective. I am just trying to say that is the the past participle of the verb "to shut". Past participles are used all of the time as adjectives.

    I though of another example of a verbs whose "principle parts" remain unchanged. "To hit".
    Today I hit, yesterday I hit, I have hit. So, in a sentence like "The hit ball flew over the fence". "Hit" is clearly modifying "ball".

    What "shut" and "hit" clearly are NOT in these sentences is simple predicates. "Gate swung" and "ball flew" are the simple subject/simple predicate pairs in the sentences in question.

    Now with a verb like "to drink" (Today I drink, yesterday I drank, I have drunk"), something else is going on with "the drunk man". "The drunk beer is now gone", would be like what I am trying to show.

    Frank

  7. #17
    Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    5
    "To" and "ajar" are clearly not verbs. Today I to, yesterday I toed... no. Nor today I ajar...

    Open can be a verb, but in your example it would not be. Now, if the word were "opened", then I would consider it so.

  8. #18
    barryashton is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Frank

    The point is not merely that 'shut' can be used as an adjective but rather that it actually is used as an adjective in my original sentence. It is simply confusing to refer to 'shut' as a past participle when it is not being used as a verb. Of course in a different example (but not the one we are discussing) 'shut' could well be used as a verb. In such a case it could well be helpful to refer to it as a past participle.

    Your reference to the verb 'to hit' (I would say the verb 'hit') is also confusing. Your example 'The hit ball flew over the fence' is somewhat contrived. Once again 'hit' is not being used as a verb. The fact that 'hit' is capable of being used as a verb in a different context is of no relevance. You are actually using 'hit' as an adjective. Further to your previous advice to look up in in a dictionary I have checked the main dictionaries for the use of 'hit' in an adjectival way. I have been unable to find any such uses. Hence my view that your use of 'hit' is contrived.

    Frank

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Antonson View Post
    "To" and "ajar" are clearly not verbs. Today I to, yesterday I toed... no. Nor today I ajar...
    But in the example I gave, what is the difference between 'shut' and 'to/ajar'?
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  10. #20
    Bimbi is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Identifying the verb

    Check this link:

    usingenglish.com/glossary/resultative-adjective.html

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