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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    I think "a" should be deleted here, as Tennessee accent is a proper noun. What do you think?

    kk-21
    ex)He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    Absolutely not.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    We always use the indefinite article here.

    He has an American accent.
    She speaks with a strong Australian accent.
    Apparently, I have a classic English accent.
    You have an Italian accent.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    What do you mean? Barb said it's not possible, while you say the opposite. I'm confused. Which is true?

  5. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    What do you mean? Barb said it's not possible, while you say the opposite. I'm confused. Which is true?
    Barb_D said that it's not possible to omit "a" and emsr2d2 said that you should use an indefinite article. I don't see how they contradict each other.

  6. keannu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    Is "accent" similar to dialect? In terms of regional accents, they are usually unique tones, stress, different words, pronunciations, etc. But can it be regarded same as "dialect"? What do you think?

  7. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Is "accent" similar to dialect? In terms of regional accents, they are usually unique tones, stress, different words, pronunciations, etc. But can it be regarded same as "dialect"? What do you think?
    See http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/pr...tml#post311345

  8. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Is "accent" similar to dialect? In terms of regional accents, they are usually unique tones, stress, different words, pronunciations, etc. But can it be regarded same as "dialect"? What do you think?
    No, an accent is not the same as a dialect.

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    #9

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    They may be used casually to mean the same, but they're not.

  9. keannu's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    I read the link, and it seems to be saying "accent" is more like pronunciation variation, while "dialect" is more like vocabulary difference, but the distinction is kind of vague. Does it go like this?

    1. We have different verb-endings in each region in Korea, some province says "-yo", some "-yoo", some "ye", etc
    We call them dialects, but are they accents in English? For example, caught is pronounced as "kɑ:t" in California, but as "kɔ:t" in New York. Are these accents?

    2.If they use jub(made-up one by me) is used in Florida, for cot(a baby bed), a totally different word, then is it a dialect?

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