Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Netherlands
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 45
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    It'd and love'd etc.

    Hi,

    I know 'it'd' is pronounced as two syllables.

    But am I right in assuming 'love'd' (love would or love had) is pronounced as one syllable. This in connection with poetry-metre/rhythm.

    Thank you,
    Joost

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 17,550
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    It'd (never written, by the way,e xcept perhaps as dialogue) would sound like "it-id."

    If you wanted to say something like "love had come, and love had gone" it would sound like "luvvid come and luvvid gone."

    It would still be two syllables for me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 3,505
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Balkenende View Post
    Hi,

    I know 'it'd' is pronounced as two syllables.

    But am I right in assuming 'love'd' (love would or love had) is pronounced as one syllable. This in connection with poetry-metre/rhythm.

    Thank you,
    Joost
    I wouldn't use either in contracted form in the context (or lack of context) presented, but given a possibility, certainly not one syllable. Perhaps you could provide an example of a complete sentence(s) for a more considered opinion.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Dutch
      • Home Country:
      • Netherlands
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Feb 2010
    • Posts: 45
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    Thanks for the answers so far.

    Part of the sentence is 'love'd have ended long ago'. (would have ended)
    (I cannot simply rearrange words/the sentence because of a given number of syllables, the rhythm and accompanying stress etc)

    I'm simply assuming it's a matter of whether or not there's a vowel at the end of the word (love - as opposed to it)

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 3,505
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Balkenende View Post
    Thanks for the answers so far.

    Part of the sentence is 'love'd have ended long ago'. (would have ended)
    (I cannot simply rearrange words/the sentence because of a given number of syllables, the rhythm and accompanying stress etc)

    I'm simply assuming it's a matter of whether or not there's a vowel at the end of the word (love - as opposed to it)
    Sorry, but I would not understand in your example that "love'd" = "love would".

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jul 2011
    • Posts: 3
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    Sorry, but I would not understand in your example that "love'd" = "love would".
    I would understand it. Generally, it would be pronounced as "love id iv". No stress on the "would" or "have".

    Thinking about your sentence, instead of 'love'd have" can you use "love would've"? Perhaps you need the stress on the "have" for your meter.

    But to answer your question, I agree with Barb_D. It's two syllables - luvvid.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,987
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    I would pronounce "Lov'd have ended long ago" with "Lov'd" as one syllable.

    I say and write "It'd" but you're right, it has two syllables.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would pronounce "Lov'd have ended long ago" with "Lov'd" as one syllable.
    I don't think I'd understand that. Would you also pronounce 'Clive'd' in 'Clive'd have done that' as one syllable?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 13-Jan-2013 at 12:05. Reason: typo

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,987
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I don't think I'd understand that. Would you also pronounce 'Clive'd' in 'Clive'd have done that' as one syllable?
    Yup! Only when speaking very informally, casually and really not taking care of my pronunciation and I really wouldn't say it to a non-native speaker and expect them to understand.

    My mate Cathy'd have done that if she'd had time. (That's not how I would write it, but "Cathy'd" would only have two syllables.)
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 13-Jan-2013 at 17:27. Reason: missing word
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: It'd and love'd etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    My mate Cathy'd done that if she'd had time. (That's not how I would write it, but "Cathy'd" would only have two syllables.)
    Wouldn't that be, "My mate Cathy'd've done that"?

    In any case, 'Cathy', ending in a vowel, is different from 'love' and 'Clive;, which end in a consonant.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •