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  1. #1
    JoKlenk Guest

    Default "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    I've often used the phrase, "I said my peace.", but have also seen "I said my piece." Which is correct? Or perhaps if we knew how the phrase came about historically, we could figure it out.
    Thanks for your help,
    Jo

  2. #2
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    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by JoKlenk
    I've often used the phrase, "I said my peace.", but have also seen "I said my piece." Which is correct? Or perhaps if we knew how the phrase came about historically, we could figure it out.
    Thanks for your help,
    Jo
    To say one's piece means you want to make yourself heard, to say what's on your mind (especially in regards to moral reasons). There is another phrase for that :" to speak one's piece" and it has the same connotation.

    I haven't looked into the origins of that phrase but that's what it means.

  3. #3
    JoKlenk Guest

    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    But which is correct? Peace or Piece? Both are used.
    Thanks,
    Jo

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    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by JoKlenk
    But which is correct? Peace or Piece? Both are used.
    Thanks,
    Jo
    I have already answered that. It's piece. If someone puts "peace" in that phrase, it's incorrect.

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    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by JoKlenk
    But which is correct? Peace or Piece? Both are used.
    Thanks,
    Jo


    http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/langu...es/001884.html

    In comparison, {"say|says|said|saying my|your|his|her|our|their piece"} 88,200 whG, while {"say|says|said|saying my|your|his|her|our|their peace"} gets 18,100, or 17% of the total. So as Arnold noted, "say one's peace" has a significant chunk of mindshare and may be on its way to domination".

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    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    Well, there is the traditional statement in wedding ceremonies, "if anyone knows of any reason why these two should not be joined in holy matrimony, may he speak now or forever hold his peace." The word "forever" indicates finality, so saying that one has "said one's peace" implies that one has said all that one is going to say. Idioms don't have to mean the literal sum of their parts. I prefer "said one's peace."

  7. #7
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    In the marriage service "Keep your peace" = keep quiet. It has nothing to do with saying your piece = having your say.

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    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    In the marriage service "Keep your peace" = keep quiet. It has nothing to do with saying your piece = having your say.
    I believe that it has everything to do with saying your peace. You either hold your peace or say your peace. Otherwise the expression would be "forever hold your piece."

  9. #9
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    Quote Originally Posted by zziggy View Post
    I believe that it has everything to do with saying your peace. You either hold your peace or say your peace. Otherwise the expression would be "forever hold your piece."
    I'm sorry but you are completely wrong, where did you get that idea?

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    Default Re: "I said my peace/piece"; which is it?

    I wrote a much longer and more detailed answer but this website timed out and lost it. I should have copied the text before I hit submit. Here's the short version.

    Both make sense. Neither are incorrect. But they are different in their meaning.

    Note: The evolution of the English language in its various forms allows for both, especially when we take into account a) the lack of historical standardization of language prior to the proliferation of dictionaries and also b) the sometimes arbitrary choices that have been made by early dictionary writers. These factors have caused a lot of confusion in etymology and at the same time, the evolution of language through new uses of words passing into the colloquial and then becoming accepted as literary through sheer frequency of use, is also worth acknowledging.

    I believe that the phrase "say your peace" pertains to saying "that which will give you satisfaction or peace of mind."

    In the related reference to "hold your peace" from the traditional wedding vow, "peace" in this instance most likely refers to "pact" meaning the wedding contract, which historically involved dowry and various conditions that had to be met before the marriage could actually occur. Therefore to "forever hold your peace" would mean to publicly "agree to your contract" without further objection and thus tacitly acknowledge the fulfillment of that contract.

    Alternatively, the usage of "piece" likely derives either from Germanic applications of the word "stück" and its possible use at various points in the history of the English language or it may have been introduced through colloquial use possibly through the common adoption of journalistic terminology as in "opinion piece" "think piece" or "piece of writing". The phrases "piece of music" and "piece of art" also come to mind.

    I personally choose to use "peace" with this particular phrase as I believe it to be more historically accurate and have a greater emotional impact as it also implies a sense of importance and finality.

    To "say your peace" means to say that which will satisfy some important issue or at least satisfy the need to let it be known.

    To "say your piece" means simply to say "that thing you want to say" and it could be as simplistic as that.

    Either work, but they have different sentiments.

    Let's see which one makes it into the 30th Century Edition of the English Dictionary.

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