English Teacher Article Adjectives - Good, Better and Best

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English has a few adjectives whose comparative and superlative forms are irregular. That is, they don't form the usual patterns for forming comparatives and superlatives (-er, -est; or -ier, iest; or more-, most-).

http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/003.html


Positive    Comparative        Superlative
good        better             best 
bad         worse              worst 
little      littler, less      littlest, least 
far         farther, further   farthest, furthest
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For ESL learners it is important to learn "good, better, best" and "bad, worse, worst" because they are very commonly used. Also, "more, most" and "less, least" are very commonly used.

It is fair to say that those adjectives known as "absolute terms" are also irregular adjectives, because they have no comparatives whatsoever.

See: http://forums.delphiforums.com/UsingEnglish/messages?msg=2357.11

base word     comparative     superlative
good          better          best 
bad           worse           worst 
little        less            least 
much (many)   more            most 
well          better          best 
far           further         furthest

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24 Comments

is the comparative form of "bold" bolder?

Thanks and regards

Yes, it is:
bold/bolder/boldest

I'm confused about Comparative and Superlative will you please describ for me, then give me example for these.

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Sr.

As far as I know it is correct to say Eg:

-This is the easiest work to do.
-This work is easier than the other.

But what about this cases:
-This work is much easier than the other
-This work is the easier than the other

In case of being correct, Do they mean the same?

Sincerely
Jonathan.

Jonathan,

-This work is much easier than the other

This sentence is fine.

-This work is the easier than the other

This one doesn't work for me- you could say that something is 'the easier of the two', but I wouldn't say 'the easier than'.

I have a doubt: how do you form the comparative for the adjective "good-lookin". I think I've heard something like: "she is the best good-looking woman I've ever seen". Is that right?
Many thanks

What would be the superlative form of "Honest"?

what is a positive for wore and what is a superlative for worse!

dear sir/madam
hope to join with to learn and study more
English such as grramer, words , topics and so on.
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When do I use Better and best?
I was told that when we are comparing two items is used "better" and when we have more than two items is used "best"
ie which apple (three kinds of apples) tastes better?
which apple tastes best? is right.
Thank you
Teresa

what is a good adjestive i onley have till so fast send in your answers plz oh ya and if you guys no any one named shahid patel tell him i am in love with him

good/gooder/goodest, right?

Hi,

I'd like to ask this question:

Of the two books, this one is......
a. better
b. the best

Thank for you help.

Good/Better/Best

it is hard for me to study it

"Farther" and "farthest" are also correct, but it depends on the context. "Further and "furthest" refer to length in the abstract sense, like in the phrase "nothing could be further from the truth."

If the length is quantifiable in meters or inches or whatnot, "father" is correct, as in "California is farther from England than New York."

Does "Applying technology better" sound stilted. I think it should be "Applying technology in a better way" or "...more effectively", although whoever dreamed up the logo (used as a signature in technical emails from an IT company) clearly wanted something snappy, whether if was a solecism or not.

Superb site by the way, speaking as an Englishman born and bred these 50 years.

Thanks.

I would like to add there there is a comparative for less.

less lesser and least.

eg when comparing two weights you could say you will take the lesser one.
or
comparing two individuals you would say 'he is the one of lesser height'. it is more formal language but it is still correct.

I think it'd be "She's the best-looking woman."
Since good-looking is basically two words(i.e.,good and looking).

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