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  1. #1
    Josefsson is offline Newbie
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    Puff, like in "He is a puff"

    Well I heard a expression they don't teach in English class here in Sweden..
    And it was the word puff. In a sentence as "He is a puff". I thought that it meant the same thing as "he is gay/homo". So am I right?

  2. #2
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    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Re: Puff, like in "He is a puff"

    I believe that is correct, although it may be dated. We don't hear it any more in Canada. Variant: poof.

  3. #3
    MrPedantic is offline Moderator
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    Re: Puff, like in "He is a puff"

    "A puff" for "a homosexual" (or simply a not very manly male) is sometimes heard in British English, as a variant of "poof" (with a hint of "powderpuff").

    I would say that it is used as a consciously dated term.

    ("Poof" itself has been reclaimed, to some extent; a well known tv singing quartet is called "Four poofs and a piano".)

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

  4. #4
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    Re: Puff, like in "He is a puff"

    It is used much more often in slang in the UK than the USA. In fact, in the USA it really does not have that meaning anymore.

  5. #5
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    BobK is online now Harmless drudge
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    Re: Puff, like in "He is a puff"

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    "A puff" for "a homosexual" (or simply a not very manly male) is sometimes heard in British English, as a variant of "poof" (with a hint of "powderpuff").

    I would say that it is used as a consciously dated term.

    ("Poof" itself has been reclaimed, to some extent; a well known tv singing quartet is called "Four poofs and a piano".)

    MrP
    Yes, dated. And now mostly used as in your example, I think. A gay man might say something like 'Why should what I think matter. I'm just a sad old poof'.

    b

  6. #6
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    Keralite is offline Member
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    Re: Puff, like in "He is a puff"

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    I believe that is correct, although it may be dated. We don't hear it any more in Canada. Variant: poof.
    Could you please tell me what does mean by 'dated' in this statement.
    I guess that it means 'Old' . Is it correct?

    Thanks in advance..

  7. #7
    buggles's Avatar
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    Re: Puff, like in "He is a puff"

    Quote Originally Posted by Keralite View Post
    Could you please tell me what does mean by 'dated' in this statement.
    I guess that it means 'Old' . Is it correct?

    Thanks in advance..
    Not just old, but old-fashioned.

    buggles (not a teacher)

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