Idiom Category: Body and bodily functions, Page 3

Categories > Body and bodily functions
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Cold shoulder
If you give or show someone the cold shoulder, you are deliberately unfriendly and unco-operative towards them.
Cold sweat
If something brings you out in a cold sweat, it frightens you a lot.
Come on the heels of
If something comes on the heels of something, it follows very soon after it.
Come to heel
If someone comes to heel, they stop behaving in a way that is annoying to someone in authority and start being obedient.
Cool your heels
If you leave someone to cool their heels, you make them wait until they have calmed down.
Cross my heart and hope to die
People say this to show how sincere their promise is.
Cry your eyes out
If you cry your eyes out, you cry uncontrollably.
Curdle your blood
If something is very frightening or disturbing, it curdles your blood.
Cut off your nose to spite your face
If you cut off your nose to spite your face, you do something rash or silly that ends up making things worse for you, often because you are angry or upset.
Cut someone off at the knees
(USA) If you cut someone off at the knees, you humiliate them or force them to do what you want.
Cut your teeth on
The place where you gain your early experience is where you cut your teeth.
Dead from the neck up
Someone who's dead from the neck up is very stupid indeed.
Deep pockets but short arms
Someone who has money but never puts his hand in his pocket to pay for anything has deep pockets but short arms.
Dip your toes in the water
If you dip your toes in the water, you try something tentatively because you are not sure whether it will work or not.
Discerning eye
If a person has a discerning eye, they are particularly good at judging the quality of something.
Don't bite the hand that feeds
When someone says this to you, they are trying to tell you not to act against those on whom you depend.
Don't stand there with curlers in your hair
This means 'don't keep me waiting'. It's said to someone who is taking too long to get moving.
Don't sweat the small stuff
(USA) This is used to tell people not to worry about trivial or unimportant issues.
Down in the mouth
If someone is down in the mouth, they look unhappy or depressed.
Drag your feet
If someone is dragging their feet, they are taking too long to do or finish something, usually because they don't want to do it.
Drop into your lap
If something drops into your lap, you receive it suddenly, without any warning. ('Fall into your lap' is also used.)
Dry as a bone
If your lawn is as dry as a bone, the soil is completely dry.
Ears are burning
If your ears are burning, you sense or know that people somewhere else are talking about you in an unpleasant way.
Easy on the eyes
Someone who's easy on the eyes is pleasing to look at, an attractive person.
Eat your heart out
If someone tells you to eat your heart out, they are saying they are better than you at something.
Elbow grease
If something requires elbow grease, it involves a lot of hard physical work.
Elbow room
If you haven't got enough elbow room, you haven't got enough space.
Eye- wash
This expression 'eye-wash' is generally used to cover up the anxiety of a person who is seeking a concrete reply or justification for an act or an event that had affected his personal image or caused him a loss. The affected person usually represents his case to the higher-ups and puts forth his demands for redressal. But the authority, in order to avoid embarassment to his organisation or to himself, is not in a position to expose the entire material or evidence which in turn tell upon the credibility of the organisation. In such circumstances, he will usually call for an investigation to satisfy the complainant, but will not be keen in disposing the case. The authority will drag on the issue, (at the same time pretending to be serious) until the seriousness of the issue dies down and no finality is reached. So, ' The investigation on the issue by the authority is an eye-wash'.
Eyeball to eyeball
If you are eyeball to eyeball with an enemy or rival, you confront or face them down them directly.
Eyes are bigger than one's stomach
If someone's eyes are bigger than their stomach, they are greedy and take on more than they can consume or manage.
Face only a mother could love
When someone has a face only a mother could love, they are ugly.
Face value
If you take something at face value, you accept the appearance rather than looking deeper into the matter.
Faint heart never won fair lady
This means that you will not get the partner of your dreams if you lack the confidence to let them know how you feel.
Fall on our feet
If you fall on your feet, you succeed in doing something where there was a risk of failure.
Fat head
A fat head is a dull, stupid person.
Feather-brained
Som eone who's feather-brained is silly, empty-headed and not serious.
Fed up to the back teeth
When you are extremely irritated and fed up with something or someone, you are fed up to the back teeth.
Feet of clay
If someone has feet of clay, they have flaws that make them seem more human and like normal people.
Feet on the ground
A practical and realistic person has their feet on the ground.
Fight tooth and nail
If someone will fight tooth and nail for something, they will not stop at anything to get what they want. ('Fight tooth and claw' is an alternative.)
Find your feet
When you are finding your feet, you are in the process of gaining confidence and experience in something.
Fine-tooth comb
If you examine or search something with a fine-tooth comb, you do it very thoroughly or carefully.('Fine-toothed comb' is also used.)
Fingers and thumbs
If you are all fingers and thumbs, you are being clumsy and not very skilled with your hands.
Fleet of foot
If someone is fleet of foot, they are very quick.
Flesh and blood
Your flesh and blood are your blood relatives, especially your immediate family.
Fly in the face of
Something that goes against what we know or expect, or what is normal or senible, it flies in the face of it.
Follow your nose
When giving directions, telling someone to follow their nose means that they should go straight ahead.
Foot in mouth
This is used to describe someone who has just said something embarrassing, inappropriate, wrong or stupid.
Foot in the door
If you have or get your foot in the door, you start working in a company or organisation at a low level, hoping that you will be able to progress from there.
Four-eyes
A person who wears glasses

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