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    #1

    date

    Hi,

    I got an example sentence from a dictionary:


    She introduced her vis-a-vis to the hostess.


    The definition of "vis-a-vis" of the sentence is "a date at a social affair", can you tell me what does the "date" mean here and what does the sentence mean?


    Thanks a lot

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    #2

    Re: date

    Where did the definition come from? Vis-a-vis can mean face to face, so it would be at some social occasion as the woman is the hostess, but the date part doesn't make much sense to me.

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    #3

    Re: date

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Where did the definition come from? Vis-a-vis can mean face to face, so it would be at some social occasion as the woman is the hostess, but the date part doesn't make much sense to me.

    Thanks a lot first, see here, definition 7. Is it an old-fashioned term?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: date

    I've never seen any of the definitions for the noun form used in my life.

    I'm most familiar with the "in relation to" usage.

    I really can't recommend using any of the noun forms in conversation in the US.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: date

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I've never seen any of the definitions for the noun form used in my life.

    I'm most familiar with the "in relation to" usage.

    I really can't recommend using any of the noun forms in conversation in the US.
    I agree. I wouldn't recommend their use in the UK either.

  3. apex2000's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: date

    'vis-a-vis' is wholly unnecessary here.

    She introduced her to the hostess
    . You can only do that when both parties are together, face to face.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: date

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    'vis-a-vis' is wholly unnecessary here.

    She introduced her to the hostess
    . You can only do that when both parties are together, face to face.
    In the definition being used, the vis-a-vis IS who was introduced and her is being used possessively. Hence my reply about using the noun forms of vis-a-vis.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: date

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I've never seen any of the definitions for the noun form used in my life.

    I'm most familiar with the "in relation to" usage.

    I really can't recommend using any of the noun forms in conversation in the US.
    Thanks a lot, BD.

    You mentioned you can't recommend using noun forms in conversation, do you mean the noun form probably used in literary?

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: date

    Simply, I've never seen or heard these forms in my life. Not in speech, not in writing, not in poetry, not in literature.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. opa6x57's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: date

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Simply, I've never seen or heard these forms in my life. Not in speech, not in writing, not in poetry, not in literature.

    I have never heard or seen these forms, either.






    ===================
    Not a teacher. American/53 years old.

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