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  1. Marco Moreira's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 16
    #1

    Go by foot.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Moreira View Post
    and the most convenient was to get there is go by foot
    Hi everybody! I was discussing with my english teacher about my e-mail. He said that we can't use "go by foot" and we should use "go on foot". I would like to know if both of them are correct on grammar, and if native speakers use both on talks. TIA!
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 03-Jun-2012 at 18:41.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,624
    #2

    Re: Go by foot.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco Moreira View Post
    Hi everybody! I was discussing with my English teacher about my e-mail. He said that we can't use "go by foot" and we should use "go on foot". I would like to know if both of them are correct on grammar, and if native speakers use both on talks. TIA!
    I have moved your post to a new thread and retitled it. We don't say "go by foot".

  3. CarloSsS's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Aug 2010
    • Posts: 629
    #3

    Re: Go by foot.

    NOT A TEACHER

    I will only add that saying "go by foot" is a common mistake among learners of English. The reason is that the learners think that if you, for example, can say "go somewhere by car/plane/taxi etc." it means that you always state the means of transportation after "by" and thus "go by foot" is possible. Sadly for us learners, while that works with machinery, it does not work with feet. Btw. a useful alternative to "go somewhere by foot" is simply saying "walk somewhere".
    Please note that I'm not a teacher.

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