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    #1

    up close view

    'You get an up close view of the Statute of Liberty'. What does 'up close' mean in this sentence?
    Last edited by skystar30097; 18-Aug-2013 at 12:07.

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    #2

    Re: up close view

    It's a bad sentence. Where did you see it?

    For a start the Statue of Liberty should be capitalised.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: up close view

    Quote Originally Posted by skystar30097 View Post
    'You can get an up close view of the statute of liberty'. What does 'up close' mean in this sentence?
    Do you know what an "up close view" is? Hint: it's a view from close to whatever you're looking at - ie. "up close".

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    #4

    Re: up close view

    Sorry I wrote it badly. Now I 've corrected the post.

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    #5

    Re: up close view

    If it's your own sentence, what did you want 'up close view' to mean?

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    #6

    Re: up close view

    I wrote it wrongly from the original text. It's not my sentence.

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    #7

    Re: up close view

    Do you understand what it means now?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: up close view

    At first I thought it means very close. But as I read more contexts of the original text, I got more confused. I found this question: ' What landmark can you see up close?" I think landmarks can be seen from far distance. That's why I got more confused.

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    #9

    Re: up close view

    Yes, you can see some landmarks from a long way away. However, this isn't about someone's ability to see something. It's about the possibility of seeing something "up close", ie you are allowed to stand very close to it and look at it. Many important buildings and sites in the world are behind fences and walls and the public are not allowed to get very close. The example you quoted at the beginning is saying that it is possible to be very close to the Statue of Liberty and look at it - that is how you get a "close up view".

    The Mona Lisa by da Vinci is a good example. Many years ago, people were allowed to stand extremely close to the painting - it was simply protected behind a single pane of glass but you could stand perhaps half a metre from it. Now, there is a barricade around it, about three metres from it in all directions so now the closest you can get to the painting is three metres away. That is not a "close up view".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: up close view

    Now, I got it. Thank you very much.

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