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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jun 2015
    • Posts: 5
    #1

    Don't you leave me?

    I thought although 'don't you' is a negative form, it means almost same as positive one.

    For example, when someone says, "don't you see?" or "don't you remember?", then I can assume they are saying "do you see" or "do you remember".

    Because I'm not native, sometimes I find it difficult to understand 'don't ~' form, so I usually interpret 'don't' as 'do'.

    But still I'm not sure of the followings..
    --
    Honest baby, I'll do anything you want to
    So can we finish what we started
    Don't you leave me brokenhearted tonight
    --
    'Brokenhearted' by Karmin.

    --
    Baby, don't you leave me
    Baby, don't you leave me
    Don't you break my heart
    --
    "Baby, Don't You Leave Me" Marvin Gaye & Kim Weston

    What does 'don't you' mean? Can you please explain about it?
    Thank you very much!!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,630
    #2

    Re: Don't you leave me?

    It means "do not".
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 969
    #3

    Re: Don't you leave me?

    I have found that negative questions can be very confusing for native Asian-language speakers. You want to agree with the speaker, but English speakers agree/disagree according to the facts.

    Let's say you are 17 years old, and I say:

    1. 'You're 17, aren't you?' You say, "Yes, I am." (I want to confirm a correct positive.) You agree.

    2. 'You're 16, aren't you?' You say, "No, I'm not." (I want to confirm an incorrect positive); you correct me.

    3. 'You're not 17, are you?' You say, "Yes, I am." (I want to confirm an incorrect negative); you correct me.

    4. 'You're not 16, are you?' (I want to confirm a correct negative.) You want to say, "Yes", as in 'Yes, you're right'. But the correct response is: "No, I'm not." The fact is that you are not 16, and you should respond accordingly, speaking in parallel with my correct statement.


    Your examples are not quite the same:

    "don't you see?" or "don't you remember?" are tag questions to confirm a belief that you do see or you do remember.

    "Don't you leave me" is a request to not leave me, even though it's in the form of a demand.
    Last edited by J&K Tutoring; 15-Dec-2015 at 15:41.

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