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    #1

    Preposition in relative pronoun

    For the sentences below extracted from Advance Grammar In Use, 3rd Edition,

    "The Roman coins, which a local farmer came across in a field, are now on display in the National Museum."

    I don't understand why it can't be re-written in the formal format as below and what wrong with this sentence. Per my speculation, it is because "come across" is a phrasal verb which is no reason for it to be placed before relative pronoun. Otherwise it will lose its particular meaning after such separation. Please confirm.

    When should we put the preposition before relative pronoun and when we shouldn't. Few examples are provided for your reference. Please advise and explain. Thanks.

    "The Roman coins, across which a local farmer came in a field, are now on display in the National Museum."

    1A) The house into which the thieves broke is owned by Caleb Cruz.
    1B) The house which the thieves broke into is owned by Caleb Cruz.

    2A) He was persuaded to stay in England by Charles Dickens, to whom he had shown his novel.
    2B) He was persuaded to stay in England by Charles Dickens, whom he had shown his novel to.

    3A) The tranquil lake into where she fell was freezing cold.
    3B) The tranquil lake where she fell into was freezing cold.
    Last edited by cyrusevilming; 03-Jan-2016 at 08:16.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Preposition in relative pronoun

    "The Roman coins, across which a local farmer came in a field, are now on display in the National Museum."

    A) The house into which the thieves broke is owned by Caleb Cruz.



    B) He was persuaded to stay in England by Charles Dickens, whom he had shown his novel to.

    A) The water into where she fell was freezing cold.
    B) The water where she fell into was freezing cold.


    All of the above are unnatural English. The last two are ungrammatical.
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Preposition in relative pronoun

    I think 'The water into which ...' is grammatical.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: Preposition in relative pronoun

    So, In which situation the preposition can be placed before relative pronoun? and the reason why it is applicable?

    1) normal verb with preposition - sit in/on (not phrasal verb)
    2) Two words verb (phrasal verb) - gear towards
    3) Three words verb - look forward to

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Preposition in relative pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by cyrusevilming View Post
    Per my speculation, it is because "come across" is a phrasal verb which is no reason for it to be placed before relative pronoun.
    I agree.

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