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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    comes with him/goes with him

    Are the following pairs of sentenses correct and natural? Do they mean the same?

    1) She often goes with him to see the opera.
    2) She often comes with him to see the opera.

    And one more pair:
    3) She often goes with me to see the opera.
    4) She often comes with me to see the opera.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: comes with him/goes with him

    If you and the people in question are actually at the opera when you say the words, then 2 and 4 could be used. Otherwise, use "goes with".

    Note that it would be more natural to simply say "to the opera" rather than "to see the opera".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: comes with him/goes with him

    The fourth is possible even if the speaker is not at the opera, in my opinion.

  4. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: comes with him/goes with him

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If you and the people in question are actually at the opera when you say the words, then 2 and 4 could be used. Otherwise, use "goes with".
    Sorry, but I didn't quite catch the difference. For me it's like this:
    1) She often goes with him to (see) the opera.
    They often go to the opera together.
    2) She often comes with him to (see) the opera.
    They often go to the opera together.
    3) She often goes with me to (see) the opera.
    We often go to the opera together.
    4) She often comes with me to (see) the opera.
    We often go to the opera together.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: comes with him/goes with him

    No. People come to a place where you are. They go to a place where you are not.
    If you want your child to be at home, you ring their mobile phone. Then if you are at home, you say "Come home". If you are not at home, you say "Go home."
    If you say "She's coming to Japan", you must be in Japan. Otherwise you say, "She's going to Japan."

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: comes with him/goes with him

    Sometimes, both are possible. If I have two tickets to the opera tonight, I could say to a friend "I have a spare ticket to the opera tonight. Do you want to come with me?" or "Do you want to go with me?"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. Piscean's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: comes with him/goes with him

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No. People come to a place where you are. They go to a place where you are not.


    I'll just add a note to that. People can come to a place where the speaker was or will be at a relevant time. Last week, while I was visiting my mother in England, I said to her, "Henry is coming to Prague next week". This was possible because, at the appropriate time, I would be in Prague, where I live, and Henry would be coming to see me. The 'to see me' is important; it clearly identifies the direction of the movement as towards the speaker (in the future 'next week'). Had I been staying two weeks with my mother, and Henry's trip been planned for a time during that two weeks, I could have said only "Henry's going to Prague next week".

    The preposition 'with' complicates things a little more. 'Come with' has a sense of 'accompany' that transcends the central idea of 'come'. Thus, sitting at home with my wife, I can say "I am going (not 'coming') to the opera this evening. Would you like to come (or 'go') with me?"

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