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  1. #21
    Silverobama is offline Key Member
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    So the symbol /i:/ represents a sustained (long) vowel, as in sheep, not a schwa. (The two dots are meant to show that the vowel can be sustained.)

    The schwa, represented by /ə/, is the short unstressed 'uh' sound, as in station and potato.
    I thought it was the same as "diseases".

  2. #22
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    jutfrank is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    You thought what was the same as "diseases"?

  3. #23
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    So the symbol /i:/ represents a sustained (long) vowel, as in sheep, not a schwa. (The two dots are meant to show that the vowel can be sustained.)

    The schwa, represented by /ə/, is the short unstressed 'uh' sound, as in station and potato.
    Thanks. I had a nagging feeling I was making a mistake. I should have held my virtual tongue.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #24
    Silverobama is offline Key Member
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    Hi teachers.

    Would you please type me the IPA of these words? I can't find the IPAs of them online.

    Chevrolet
    Brendan Duggan

  5. #25
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    This Wikipedia page tells you about Chevrolet. If you can't access that: Chevrolet (/ˌʃɛvrəˈleɪ/ SHEV-rə-LAY)

    /'brɜndən'dʌgən/

  6. #26
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    This Wikipedia page tells you about Chevrolet. If you can't access that: Chevrolet (/ˌʃɛvrəˈleɪ/ SHEV-rə-LAY)
    We don't emphasize the first syllable in American English: shev-rə-LAY.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. #27
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    We don't emphasize the first syllable in American English: shev-rə-LAY.
    If you look very closely at the IPA, you'll see two tiny marks—one before the first syllable, at the bottom, and one before the last syllable, at the top. These mark stress.

    A stress mark at the top marks primary stress and a stress mark at the bottom marks secondary stress. So in American English, both syllables are indeed stressed, but one has more stress than the other.

    Interestingly (or not), most Brits would stress these syllables the other way round, i.e., with primary stress on the first syllable.

  8. #28
    Silverobama is offline Key Member
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    Hi teachers.

    Would you please type me the IPA of the word "brachii"?

    Here's the context. The biceps brachii, commonly known as the biceps, is a two-headed muscle that lies on the upper arm between the shoulder and the elbow. (From wikipedia.com)

  9. #29
    rompercabeza is offline Newbie
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Hi teachers.

    Would you please type me the IPA of the word "brachii"?

    Here's the context. The biceps brachii, commonly known as the biceps, is a two-headed muscle that lies on the upper arm between the shoulder and the elbow. (From wikipedia.com)
    brachii
    adjective
    ANATOMY specialized
    UK /ˈbreɪ.ki.aɪ/ US /ˈbreɪ.ki.aɪ/



    a Latin word meaning "of the arm", used in medical names and descriptions





    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/...nglish/brachii

  10. #30
    Silverobama is offline Key Member
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    Re: Some IPA of names

    Hi teachers.

    I wonder if you show me the IPA of these two words in the following context.

    1) I'm suspending judgment on the book I'm reading until I've finished it.

    Should it be "t" or "d"?

    2) Sam blocked the corridor off with a row of chairs.

    Should it be "roh"?

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