Poll: If you have an appointment, which sentence do you use?

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  1. #1
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Appointments


  2. #2
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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    I can't vote, because I don't use any of them. (I'd say, "I have an appointment tomorrow for 3 o'clock.")

    :wink:

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Force yourself. Imagine you were in London with crippling toothache.

  4. #4
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    :wink:

  5. #5
    Nessa is offline Newbie
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    Re: Appointments

    I would say "I'm seeing the dentist tomorrow at 3". But I could use any of the top two options aswell.

  6. #6
    EGrammar_Learner is offline Newbie
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    Re: Appointments

    I would say there is only 1 answer here :
    - I am going to see the dentist tomorrow at 3.

    I have an appointment at 3, it means I know exactly when (time and date) I have to go to see the dentist. "Going to do something" is "to have to do something".


    Am I right? My English is really limited so I can only explain that much. By the way, my 6th sense tells me to choose the 1st answer, too. :)) When I speak English I do not/cannot always remember all the grammar rules. I often rely on my instinct.

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Appointments

    Post in Ask a Teacher. This section is not for questions from learners- it's for polls to practise things.

  8. #8
    srk2bolly is offline Newbie
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    Post Re: Appointments

    I THINK IT IS FUTURE TENSE THAT WAS THIS IS CORRECT

    "I will see the dentist tomorrow at 3"

  9. #9
    gabri is offline Newbie
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    Re: Appointments

    I think the right answer is "I'm seeing the dentist at 3 tomorrow" if you have called the dentist; if you have the intention to go to the dentist at 3, but you haven't called yet you say "I'm going to see the dentist at 3"(but in that case you don't have an appointment).

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: Appointments

    And, as we normally make appointments to see a dentist, the first of your choices is more likely.

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