Results 1 to 6 of 6
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    Question tongue position to say d

    Please, Iīd like to know if the tongue touches the teeth pronuncing "d" specially at the end of a Word or for instance saying "I,d", because i canīt help rubbing the teeth with my tongue. It very important for me īcos i love perfection. thanks

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: tongue position to say d

    Welcome to the forum, Luckyaxe. I have moved your question to a more appropriate forum.

    When we produce /d/ and /t/, the tip of the tongue makes a closure with the upper alveolar ridge. The tip of the tongue does not touch the front teeth.

    Please note:

    We always use a capital letter for the pronoun 'I'.
    We do not leave a space before an apostrophe.
    In this English language forum, we do not use text speak words such as 'cos. The word is because.

  2. probus's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 3,458
    #3

    Re: tongue position to say d

    In Spanish your tongue touches your teeth when you say d, but not in English

    Let me try to explain what 5jj meant when he said "alveolar ridge." Start with your tongue touching your upper front teeth. Then move it slowly backwards along the roof of your mouth until it feels two more or less circular depressions on each side, just before the slope of your mouth's upper surface increases sharply. That is the alveolar ridge, where your tongue must be in order to pronounce a perfect English d.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #4

    Re: tongue position to say d

    Let me illustrate the alveolar ridge for you:
    https://www.google.com.au/search?hl=....0.riqsCeynLc8

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 2
    #5

    Re: tongue position to say d

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    In Spanish your tongue touches your teeth when you say d, but not in English

    Let me try to explain what 5jj meant when he said "alveolar ridge." Start with your tongue touching your upper front teeth. Then move it slowly backwards along the roof of your mouth until it feels two more or less circular depressions on each side, just before the slope of your mouth's upper surface increases sharply. That is the alveolar ridge, where your tongue must be in order to pronounce a perfect English d.
    yes. I knew that but when I did that the exact point of my tongue rubbs the upper part of my teeth and the part whitch i touch with my tongue the alvolar ridge is not the exact tip of my tongue, is a bit behind. Is that normal? please I need to know

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #6

    Re: tongue position to say d

    For some speakers, it is the blade, the part just behind the tip, that makes contact with the alveolar ridge. This is OK, but if you wish to be sure of producing a natural English sound, try using the tip. If your tongue touches your teeth, move it back; it's not that dificult.

    The only difficulty is that in Spanish, the hard /d/ is produced with the tongue touching the teeth, so you will have to think about your /d/ sound, and try to break the habit of producing a Spanish hard /d/. I have to say that if you do produce the Spanish hard /d/, everybody will understand you with no difficulty.

Similar Threads

  1. The position of the tongue in the vowels
    By BeaSirpa in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Mar-2011, 10:50
  2. Tongue position in /s/ sound
    By literal in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-May-2010, 02:51
  3. tongue
    By peter123 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Apr-2009, 03:55

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •