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  1. Augustine06's Avatar
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    #1

    "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    Dear Teachers,

    Could you please clarify if there are any circumstances when the following sentence could be considered grammatical and why (or why not)?
    "If only a disagreement makes you be quit of me, we don't belong together".
    This is how the person who wrote this sentence (as a translation from Russian) explains why he thinks it's absolutelly correct: (quote) "it makes you be quit of me" in this translation means "it makes you be in a better state for having removed my (troublesome or unwanted) person". In other words, what he was trying to say by this phrase was something like "if even after a tiny disagreement you stop treating me like your friend and start distancing yourself from me then we don't belong together". To me the whole "makes you be quit of me" thing looks very wrong but as I'm not a linguist I simply can't explain why I find it grammatically incorrect. Could you please help me on this one?

    Thanks a lot in advance :)
    Last edited by Augustine06; 20-Oct-2015 at 18:06.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    "Makes you be quit of me" is something I have never heard.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    It means nothing to me either. I can only assume it should be "... makes you quit on me ..." or, possibly, "... make you quit me ...".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Augustine06's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Makes you be quit of me" is something I have never heard.
    Thank you, MikeNewYork :) I've never came across anything like that either. I'm just wondering if there are any grammar rules explaining why it's not (or maybe it is) correct.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    There is no grammar rule I can think of. The phrase is simply not idiomatic English.

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    I think the construction 'make someone be + bare infinitive' is ungrammatical.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. Augustine06's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think the construction 'make someone be + bare infinitive' is ungrammatical.
    Hi Matthew :)
    You see, according to the dictionaries "be quit of somebody/something" is an adjective. It's not an action, it's a state. For example one can say "I want to be quit of (someone or something)" meaning "I want to be free from...". But even then "makes you be quit of..." doesn't make any sense to me.

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    If 'quit' is an adjective, it should be 'make someone quit of somebody/something', i.e. 'be' should not be there.

    'quit
    adj
    7. (foll by: of) free (from); released (from): he was quit of all responsibility for their safety.'── quoted from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/quit

    If the above definition is correct, I think 'make someone quit of someone else' means 'make someone free from someone else'.
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 20-Oct-2015 at 19:37.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. Augustine06's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: "be quit of somebody" after the verb "make"

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    If 'quit' is an adjective, it should be 'make someone quit of somebody/something', i.e. 'be' should not be there.

    'quit
    adj
    7. (foll by: of) free (from); released (from): he was quit of all responsibility for their safety.'── quoted from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/quit

    If the above definition is correct, I think 'make someone quit of someone else' means 'make someone free from someone else'.
    Well, right. Then like emsr2d2 wrote above, it should be "makes you quit on me". But again, this would be an action and this would be correct.

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