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    #1

    Exclamation ought to/ should

    hi

    I know that there is a difference in meaning between should and ought to, that is should is used to refer to an idea (you should see this movie). But, ought to is used when there will be some bad consequences (you ought to study for the exam). However, I wonder if the same difference exist when we make use of "ought to/ should" in expressing degrees of certainty in the future time as in "you should do well on the test" and "you ought to do well on the test". Is there any difference between these two forms?

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: ought to/ should

    Quote Originally Posted by Venus.jam View Post
    hi

    I know that there is a difference in meaning between should and ought to, that is should is used to refer to an idea (you should see this movie). But, ought to is used when there will be some bad consequences (you ought to study for the exam).
    That is not true.

    The only difference between the two verbs is that ought to can always be replaced by should with no change in meaning, 'should cannot always be replaced by ought to.

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    #3

    Re: ought to/ should

    I see. Would you please answer the questions below:

    1. could you please let me know in what situations "should" cannot be replaced by "ought to"?

    2. Do you mean that we cannot use "should" when we want to refer to someone's responsibility or duty?


    3. what about this sentence "you ought not park your car here. As "ought not" is not common can we replace it by "should not" in this sentence? But, what if a policeman want to tell the same statement. I think "should" does not show warning. Does the policeman say "you had better not park your car here?"
    Last edited by Venus.jam; 17-Feb-2017 at 07:55.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: ought to/ should

    Quote Originally Posted by Venus.jam View Post
    I see. Would you please answer the questions below:
    Please ask one question at a time.

    1. could you please let me know in what situations "should" cannot be replaced by "ought to"?
    Hypothetical should:

    If I should die, think only this of me ...
    Should you have any problems, please don't hesitate to contact me.


    After certain adjectives and nouns:

    It is interesting that you should say that.
    It was his wish that I should keep this a secret
    .

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    #5

    Re: ought to/ should

    Quote Originally Posted by Venus.jam View Post
    3. What about this sentence? "You ought not to park your car here. As "ought not" is not common can we replace it by "should not" in this sentence? But, what if a policeman wants to say tell the same statement. I think "should" does not show warning. Does the policeman say "you had better not park your car here?"
    An American police officer would probably say You can't park your car here. From what I understand, a British policeman would say What's all this, then?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: ought to/ should

    "2. Do you mean that we cannot use "should" when we want to refer to someone's responsibility or duty?"

    I can't find any way that he could have meant that. How did you infer that?

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    #7

    Re: ought to/ should

    He said "should cannot always be replaced by ought to". Thus, I just inferred it from what I'd read from a grammar book which says Should and ought to both express advisability. Their meaning ranges in strength from a suggestion (this is a good idea) to a statement about responsibility or duty (This is a very important thing to do).

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    #8

    Re: ought to/ should

    Sorry, I'm lost. But it's not important.

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    #9

    Re: ought to/ should

    He said "not always", Venus.jam.
    He meant 'should' can sometimes be replaced by 'ought to', but not always.


    (Edit)
    After I read your post #3 again, you seem to understand what 'not always' means.
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 18-Feb-2017 at 07:02.

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