anti-slavery

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jasonlulu_2000

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Again and again, in the postwar years, Twain seemed forced to deal with the challenge of race. Consider the most controversial, at least today, of Twain’s novels, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Only a few books have been kicked off the shelves as often as Huckleberry Finn, Twain’s most widely read tale. Once upon a time, people hated the book because it struckthemas rude. Twain himself wrote that those who banned the book considered the novel “trash and suitable only for the slums.” More recently the book has been attacked because of the character Jim, the escaped slave, and many occurrences of the word nigger. (The term Nigger Jim, for which the novel is often severely criticized, never appears in it.)
But the attacks were and are silly—and miss the point. The novel is strongly anti-slavery. Jim’s search through the slave states for the family from whom he has been forcibly parted is heroic. As J. Chadwick has pointed out, the character of Jim was a first in American fiction—a recognition that the slave had two personalities, “the voice of survival within a white slave culture and the voice of the individual: Jim, the father and the man.”

Q: What best proves Twain’s anti-slavery stand according to the author?
A. Jim’s search for his family was described in detail.
B. The slave’s voice was first heard in American novels.
C. Jim grew up into a man and a father in the white culture.
D. Twain suspected that the slaves were less intelligent.

The answer given is C.

What does a native teacher make of it? Answer C is a correct sentence, but how does it prove Twain's anti-slavery stand?

Thanks!

Jason
 

probus

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This is homework. None of the proposed answers emerge from the given text. Jason, I regret having answered some of your previous queries.
 

jasonlulu_2000

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I have some difficulty in understanding the answer given. Just want any tip or perspective from a native teacher. Like this passage, I couldn't figure out why C is right. Therefore, I want to confirm it with a native. Maybe it is a dodgy question or a dodgy answer.

Never did/will I want anyone to do homework.

If my question causes any discomfort, sorry. Hopefully, you can still lend a hand.
 
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Tdol

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C does not make sense to me. I think it's a dodgy question and a dodgy answer.

(Please understand that we do get a lot of homework posted here, which we don't do for people, so we're not trying to be rude)
 

SlickVic9000

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C does not make sense to me. I think it's a dodgy question and a dodgy answer.

(Please understand that we do get a lot of homework posted here, which we don't do for people, so we're not trying to be rude)

That's modern multiple choice for you. "Please choose the least incorrect answer." I think some test makers' idea of a challenging exam involves broad questions and vague answers.
 
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