[Grammar] Are commas for single words inside or outside the quotation marks? (American English)

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donnach

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Is this correct in American English? (It's an example I made-up in order to understand the rules of quotation marks and commas in this type of situation.)

The "Apple" row intersects with the columns labeled "Orange", "Grape", and "Strawberry".

Or should it be written this way:

The "Apple" row intersects with the columns labeled "Orange,""Grape," and "Strawberry."

Thank you,

Donna
 
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Rover_KE

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The "Apple" row intersects with the columns labeled "Orange", "Grape", and "Strawberry". :tick:

Or should it be written this way:

The "Apple" row intersects with the columns labeled "Orange,""Grape," and "Strawberry."
:cross:
 

SoothingDave

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The "Apple" row intersects with the columns labeled "Orange", "Grape", and "Strawberry". :tick:

Or should it be written this way:

The "Apple" row intersects with the columns labeled "Orange,""Grape," and "Strawberry."
:cross:

With all due respect, Rover, in AmE the commas go inside the quotation marks. "Orange," "grape," and "strawberry."
 

Barb_D

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Right, it makes no sense, but the American style always - always! - puts the comma and period inside the quotes. It's one of the few style rules that has an always.
 

TheParser

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NOT A TEACHER


Donna,


Two Americans have given you the American rule.

I thought that you would find the following example amusing. Notice where Americans put the comma:


"In a recent article titled 'What Do Banks Do?,' which appeared in ...."
 

5jj

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I rarely feel that British conventions are 'better than American, or vice versa - both are equally valid - but, on this occasion, I have to say that the British system appears more logical. Orange is the column label; Orange, is not.
 

Barb_D

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I completely agree with you! But since style guides ARE one of those things they vote on and there IS a "correct" format, and your teacher, your employer, or you publisher will all tell you that you have to follow it, you do. If I ever do get a vote, though, I will suggest we follow the more logical form.
 

Tdol

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I rarely feel that British conventions are 'better than American, or vice versa - both are equally valid - but, on this occasion, I have to say that the British system appears more logical. Orange is the column label; Orange, is not.

AmE is ahead on spelling IMO, but BrE does make more sense here to me. ;-)
 

5jj

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This is completely off-topic, but my excuse is that I need to atone for my earlier post saying that BrE practice was (in this case!) more logical. I tell my students that life will be simpler for them if they use HAVE in the AmE way.
 

5jj

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This ridiculousness is only superseded by the non-adaption of the metric system.
Adaption? Superseded? I am not quite sure what you are saying here.
 

SoothingDave

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Adaption? Superseded? I am not quite sure what you are saying here.

I think he thinks Americans should abandon their birthright and adopt the metric system. I only point out that the system was invented by the French.
 

5jj

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I only point out that the system was invented by the French.
Well, yours was invented by the British, so you are between a rock and a hard place. :cool:
 

BobSmith

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Oops... typo. I meant "adoption".

This ridiculousness (of putting commas inside quotes in this instance, in the U.S.) is only superseded by the U.S.'s non-adoption of the metric system. The only thing dumber than "inside commas" is not using the metric system. Eh, it's a stretch.
 

bhaisahab

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I think he thinks Americans should abandon their birthright and adopt the metric system. I only point out that the system was invented by the French.

Parts of the USA were colonised by the French, almost as much as by the British. Many parts, of the south especially, have a lingering French connection, family surnames, names of locations, etcetera.
 
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