behead, decapitate

hhtt21

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I would like to ask about the verbs behead and decapitate, presumably the exact synonyms.

1. Why is it written as "Thulsa Doom behead's Conan's mother" instead of "Thulsa Doom beheads Conan's mother"?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huTKdSZMRPg

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GoesStation

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Many native Anglophones are confused about when to use apostrophes. They generally use too many rather than too few.
 

hhtt21

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Many native Anglophones are confused about when to use apostrophes. They generally use too many rather than too few.

This implies the original is wrong.

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hhtt21

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Many native Anglophones are confused about when to use apostrophes. They generally use too many rather than too few.

This is very strange to me because this is error of the kind that a before-school-child would do.

P.S: I do not know which word or phrase express the children not started to school yet.

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Rover_KE

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This is very strange to me because this is an error of the kind that a before-school-child would make.
You are expecting too much from pre-school children.
 

emsr2d2

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Apostrophes are misused so much by native speakers in the UK (and probably elsewhere) that people (like me) can join the Apostrophe Protection Society. You need to remember, hhtt21, that most schoolchildren in the UK don't formally learn grammar, spelling or punctuation.
 

GoesStation

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I'm pretty sure most American schoolchildren are taught a certain amount of grammar. They are all taught spelling and punctuation. As with any kind of teaching, most of the students learn far less than their teachers would like.
 

hhtt21

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Apostrophes are misused so much by native speakers in the UK (and probably elsewhere) that people (like me) can join the Apostrophe Protection Society. You need to remember, hhtt21, that most schoolchildren in the UK don't formally learn grammar, spelling or punctuation.
This is very strange, even ridiculous to me because if they will not learn such issues in the school, where will they learn them? There are thousands of grammar and vocabulary books for English, are all these books for foreigners?

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Rover_KE

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Are we to believe (1) that all infants in Turkey learn the minutiae of Turkish grammar before they go to school, and (2) that all Turkish school leavers are flawless speakers and writers of the language?
 
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hhtt21

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Are we to believe (1) that all infants in Turkey learn the minutiae of Turkish grammar before they go to school, and (2) that all Turkish school leavers are flawless speakers and writers of the language?
You misunderstood me. The strange thing for me is that language, grammar and vocabulary are very important so they should be taught at school, starting from primary schools. Goesstation explained that his country's education policy is in that way but yours is not.

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Tdol

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This implies the original is wrong.

The internet is often wrong. If you know that something is wrong grammatically and can state with certainty why, you are very likely to be right. People post at speed, so even experts make mistakes, but people, native speakers, whose knowledge is a bit shaky may well make obvious errors.
 

hhtt21

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Many native Anglophones are confused about when to use apostrophes. They generally use too many rather than too few.

There are concepts as Anglophones, Francophones. What is the correpondences for the languages Spanish, Italian, German, Chinese, Turkish and Russian?

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emsr2d2

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I found this by Googling "Anglophone francophone". You could have done the same.
 

GoesStation

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My favorite is lusophone. The word bears no resemblance to the name of the language that lusophones speak.
 

Raymott

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My favorite is lusophone. The word bears no resemblance to the name of the language that lusophones speak.
Sure, but as Wikipedia tells us, "The term Lusophone is a classical compound, whereby the combining form "Luso-" derives from the Latin term for an area roughly corresponding to modern Portugal, called Lusitania". I would guess that their language was called Lusitanian.

 

hhtt21

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I found this by Googling "Anglophone francophone". You could have done the same.

Are they in use? Are they as natural as Anglophone and Francohophone?

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Rover_KE

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At least two people answered that in ems's link:

I'm a lover of languages, especially English. Even so, I wouldn't/don't use any of those terms outside of anglo- and francophone. Why needlessly clutter the language with useless words that 0.01% of the population will use 0.02% of the time? "Chinese speaker" is succinctly clear, and has zero chance of confusing the listener.
Other than anglophone and francophone, the other terms are very rarely used and are best avoided and clear forms such as "Italian speaker" used instead. In fact, I would probably avoid anglophone and francophone as well.


 

GoesStation

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I use Hispanophone, and would use Russophone and other similar words with familiar roots. (Hispan- is widely used in American English in "Hispanic" so I count it as familiar.) I'd avoid words like lusophone outside of a context where my interlocutors would be likely to know them.
 
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