Can a single countable noun accompany more than one determiner?

toloue_man

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As the title speaks for itself, can a single countable noun accompany more than one determiner? Can you cite a few examples for me?


 

Raymott

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Sure. "This is the kitten that I promised you." 'Kitten' is accompanied by 'this', 'the' and 'that'.
Is that what you mean? I don't think accompany is a grammatical term.
 

toloue_man

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Sure. "This is the kitten that I promised you." 'Kitten' is accompanied by 'this', 'the' and 'that'.
Is that what you mean? I don't think accompany is a grammatical term.

Not exactly. I need a sentence that no other words interrupt the head noun such as:

These are the three cats that I talked you about. Is this sentence grammatical?

And, why do you believe that "accompany" is not grammatical?
 

Raymott

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Yes the sentence in your second line above is grammatical.

"Accompany" is not a grammatical term in the sense that, say 'modify' or 'qualify' are. "Adverbs modify verbs", "Adjectives qualify nouns". 'Accompany' doesn't mean anything to me in grammar, though I can see now that your question is whether more than one determiner can directly precede a noun. Yes, your sentence demonstrates that.
 
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