can of yogurt

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curiousmarcus

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nestlecreamyyogurt500g.jpg

Your son's becoming a big eater. He just finished two cans of yogurt in one sitting.

Do you call the above a can​ of yogurt?
 

GoesStation

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It's a container of yogurt. Cans are metal.
 

Rover_KE

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In BE, it's a pot of yoghurt.

See also this interesting thread.
 

emsr2d2

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It's a pot or a tub of yoghurt.
 

Tdol

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emsr2d2

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Not for me. A carton is usually square or rectangular and made of cardboard, sometimes with a foil lining. Tetrapaks are the most common cartons.
 

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It's a "cup" to me. Or "container."
 

Skrej

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I'd call it a 'cup' as well.
 

tedmc

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I called it a 'cup' but my post was deleted.:roll:
 

Rover_KE

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Sorry, Ted.

I've spent two years in the USA and never heard it called a 'cup'.
 

SoothingDave

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They were literally 8 oz cups of yogurt until Dannon downsized the product to 6.
 

emsr2d2

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The reason it's not a cup (of any description) in BrE is that we don't use cups as a unit of measurement. That seems to be unique to American measurements. I spend an inordinate amount of time converting cups into grams/kilograms/fluid ounces/millilitres etc when I want to make a dish for which I only have an American recipe.
 

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I just had my lunch, and my yogurt was 6 ounces by weight, not 6 fluid ounces. So my previous post wasn't entirely correct.

Still, the yogurt cup is basically like a little cup, so the name is still valid.

The use of "cup" for a small serving size is common. Like asking for a "cup" of soup in a restaurant.
 

emsr2d2

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I've never asked for, or been offered, a cup of soup at a restaurant. Soup comes in bowls, albeit of varying sizes.
 

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When you order in a restaurant here, you have the choice of a cup or a bowl. The cup is a smaller serving.

Do you use "cup" for a small container for drinking? If it's small (200 ml or so) and especially if plastic, it's a "cup."

Toddlers use "sippy cups" with the lids on to prevent spillage.
 

Skrej

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In the US, it's common in restaurants have a choice between a 'cup of soup' and a 'bowl of soup'. Although the respective sizes vary, a 'bowl' is the larger serving size between the two.

Sometimes the bowl is offered as an entree, with the cup being one of your options for a side dish.

*cross posted with Dave
 

GoesStation

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Sometimes the bowl is offered as an entree, with the cup being one of your choices for a side dish.

An entree​ in AmE is the main dish.
 

emsr2d2

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In the UK, cups are from drinking tea and coffee from (as adults) and small plastic (sippy) cups are for any liquid for little kids. There is a product called "cup-a-soup", which is a freeze-dried powdered soup mix - you empty out the contents into a tea/coffee cup, add boiling water and stir to make a snack-sized soup. What you end up with is, admittedly, a cup of soup but we certainly don't serve such things in restaurants.
 

Rover_KE

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emsr2d2; said:
... but we certainly don't serve such things in restaurants.
There's always some smarty-pants to come along and say the opposite, isn't there?:roll:

I've been enjoying a cup or a bowl of soup for some years now in the restaurant of Lakeland.co.uk at Windermere.
 

emsr2d2

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Smartypants! ;-)

In my defence, I was trying to point out that you can't order a Batchelor's Cup-a-Soup in a restaurant!
 
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