[Vocabulary] clothes tree

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atabitaraf

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A clothes tree is a pole, but I hang my clothes on another thing.
It is a long piece of wood or plastic, with several hooks on it. What should I call it?
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billmcd

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A clothes tree.
 

5jj

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Clothes tree must be American. I have never heard of it.
 

Rover_KE

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emsr2d2

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billmcd

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Can I ask you what you use for a wood with hooks on it, to hang your clothes on? Thank you.

At the extreme risk of repeating myself, "a clothes tree". Google "clothes tree pictures". Now, I'll be moving on.
 

Rover_KE

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Do you mean one of these or one of these?

It's the second of those. (The OP asked: 'A clothes tree is a pole, but I hang my clothes on another thing.
It is a long piece of wood or plastic, with several hooks on it'.)

Rover
 

atabitaraf

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So in American English, for both coat-rack and coat-stand, they use clothes-tree. But in images.google.com it's only for the pole.
Thank you all.
 

SoothingDave

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So in American English, for both coat-rack and coat-stand, they use clothes-tree. But in images.google.com it's only for the pole.
Thank you all.

I would call a coat rack a coat rack. A clothes tree seems to have many more protrusions for hanging things.
 

billmcd

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So in American English, for both coat-rack and coat-stand, they use clothes-tree. But in images.google.com it's only for the pole.
Thank you all.

Well, I just can't resist one more response, but I promise, the last. A clothes/coat tree or pole or stand would be a vertical rack upon which one would/could hang anything, but most often clothing and in particular a coat, but in any case depending where the structure (usually portable) would be located, i.e. foyer, bedroom etc. On the other hand, a clothes rack could be (1) a horizontal piece of material, usually wood, and usually affixed to a wall, but again depending on location, upon which one could hang clothing or (2) a portable device i.e. with wheels of wood or metal , used for the same purpose as in (1). And finally ( and I mean finally), the term "clothes rack" is also known as a "garment rack".
 

Gillnetter

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So in American English, for both coat-rack and coat-stand, they use clothes-tree. But in images.google.com it's only for the pole.
Thank you all.
Some may, I've never heard the term before.
 

Barb_D

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I've never heard of people using a "clothes tree" except when people are referring to their treadmills.


We have closets and dressers, but no one I have ever met hangs their clothes on a coat rack or a row of hooks. Coats and other outerwear may be hung on hooks like that by the building entrance.

I think I"d say "coat rack" before I'd say "coat stand" but I"d understand the latter. I would not say "coat tree."
 

emsr2d2

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I think that was what was throwing me too. I would not expect to see any clothing except coats/outdoor jackets (and maybe hats and scarves) hung on the horizontal piece of wood or pole with hooks coming out of it.

For me, a clothes/garment rack is usually made of metal, and is rectangular in shape - a pole at the bottom, two verticals and then a pole across the top from which you hang clothes hangers, and the clothes hang on those hangers. The rack may or not be on wheels.

It looks like this.

And like this once the hangers are on it (this is a more convoluted one than the one I described above but I would still call this a clothes/garment rack).
 

Barb_D

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(I thought you'd like the treadmill reference, ems.)
 

Rover_KE

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I didn't get it.:-(
 

emsr2d2

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I didn't get it.:-(

It's a reference to the number of people who buy a treadmill (or exercise bike) in order to get fit in their own home, but the contraption ends up stuck in the corner of the bedroom simply being used as a handy place to hang your clothes!
 

5jj

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It's a reference to the number of people who buy a treadmill (or exercise bike) in order to get fit in their own home, but the contraption ends up stuck in the corner of the bedroom simply being used as a handy place to hang your clothes!
Never having felt the slightest urge to buy any instrument of torture, I didn't understand that, either. Rover, like me, clearly has a sensible respect for his own body.
 
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