[Grammar] Complex Subject

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usignolo

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Word formation​

Here is the sentence:​
[FONT=&quot]
1)Television has (proven)an important source of production finance.
The correct answer is proved and I chose it, but I would like to know why "to be" is not used in this case.

A) Is it the [/FONT]Nominative with the Infinitive=Complex Subject?

It is a pity that in all my grammar books different authors write something like this
"The linking verbs, appear, prove, and seem are sometimes followed by the infinitive to be and a complement (an adjective or noun). This use of the infinitive is called a predicate infinitive (PI)."

I always don't like these "often" or "sometimes".

Could you look for an example of using prove like in my sentence without to in a good grammar book.

It's very important for me, but I can't find any example of using prove without to in grammar books.

Thanks in advance!:)
 

usignolo

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Help me, please:)
 

Kondorosi

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Zdrastuite rebeata! ;-)

Television has proven(US)/proved(BrE) an important source of production finance. :tick:

has proven/proved = linking verb
an important source of production finance = predicate nominative (NP)

Television has proven/proved to be an important source of production finance. :tick:

has proven/proved = V
to be an important source of production finance = Od
to be = linking verb
an important source of prod. fin. = pred. nom.
 

usignolo

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Thanks a lot!
The point is that I can't find any examples of using "prove" without to be in goog grammar books)

By the way, do you know Russian?:)
 

usignolo

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What does od mean?
 

philo2009

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Thanks a lot!
The point is that I can't find any examples of using "prove" without to be in goog grammar books)

The predicate infinitive 'to be' after 'prove' can normally be omitted where it is complemented by either a noun or an adjective, but not when complemented by an adverbial, hence

This has proved an invaluable source of information.
(= This has proved to be an invaluable source of information.)

He has proved useful to us in the past.
(= He has proved to be useful to us in the past.)

They have proved to be up to the task on every occasion.
(but not *They have proved up to the task...)
 
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