[Vocabulary] crib

Status
Not open for further replies.

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Click here for evidence that 'crib' is alive and well in modern English, and here to consult lots of other dictionaries.

Bookmark both sites for future reference.
 

Saki6

Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2016
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Japanese
Home Country
Japan
Current Location
Japan
Click here for evidence that 'crib' is alive and well in modern English, and here to consult lots of other dictionaries.

Bookmark both sites for future reference.

I've looked at the first site. The percentage numbers are very low. I'm wondering why you could say that the verb "crib," which means "to copy or take someone else's work," is alive and well in modern English.
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Irrespective of the percentage numbers, the word is virtually as common now as it's ever been since 1800, so I wouldn't say it's archaic — or even old-fashioned.
 

Skrej

Key Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Member Type
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I've looked at the first site. The percentage numbers are very low.

The thing with those percentages on Ngram is that they're the percentages of usage of a particular word from amongst all the billions (or possibly trillions?) of written English words for a period of 200 years or so, so the percentages are relative.

There are just too many written English words for any word to make up any significant percentage of a corpus of collected written English. Even some of the most-used words in English don't merit very high percentages. Note there are only two words, 'the' and 'and', which even make it above one full percentage point.

The key to the Ngrams isn't as much about the actual percentages, but the percentages in comparison against both other similar words, as well as comparison over time.

Since you're asking about a word being archaic, you'll want to focus on the usage over time. You'll note that although 'crib' goes through periods where its usage declines quite a bit (for some reason it really fell out of favor between 1943 and 1962), overall it continues to steadily rise in usage.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top