Diagramming sentences

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Haileycooper

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New born babies cry often
 

emsr2d2

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Welcome to the forum. :hi:

1. Do you have a question for us?
2. When is your homework due?
3. You have omitted a closing punctuation mark.
4. "Newborn" is one word.
 

TheParser

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Welcome to the forum. :hi:

1. Do you have a question for us?
2. When is your homework due?
3. You have omitted a closing punctuation mark.
4. "Newborn" is one word.


The OP has not replied.

Are we members now allowed to comment on that sentence in case a few other members (or guests) are interested in diagramming it?
 

probus

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TheParser

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New born babies cry often

NOT A TEACHER

I do not know whether the OP wanted a traditional Reed-Kellogg diagram or a tree diagram that is taught at the university.

Here in the (United) States, few teachers use the Reed-Kellogg system, but a few people believe that it is an excellent way for intermediate learners to learn the 8 traditional parts of speech. Most teachers seem to feel that it is a waste of time and does little to teach good writing, for example.

The "skeleton" of the OP's sentence is "Babies cry." That is the basic sentence. All the other words are additional information. So "babies" is the subject, and "cry" is the predicate.

"Newborn" is an adjective that modifies the noun "babies," and "often" is an adverb that modifies the verb "cries." I am unable to do so, but maybe another member will show us the Reed-Kellogg diagram for that sentence. For a few people such as I, the diagram is a beautiful picture of the sentence, showing where each of the four words belongs.

By the way, I think that some people feel that there may be a difference in emphasis, depending on whether the adverb "often" is placed before or after the verb. I do not have the confidence to suggest the difference.

(If anyone is interested in learning the Reed-Kellogg diagramming system, please check out the website German Latin English.com.)
 

Phaedrus

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The "skeleton" of the OP's sentence is "Babies cry." That is the basic sentence. All the other words are additional information. So "babies" is the subject, and "cry" is the predicate.

"Newborn" is an adjective that modifies the noun "babies," and "often" is an adverb that modifies the verb "cries." I am unable to do so, but maybe another member will show us the Reed-Kellogg diagram for that sentence.
My thanks to TheParser for the excellent comments on the Reed-Kellogg diagramming system. I hope that the diagram I have attached for "Newborn babies cry often" realizes your vision for that sentence.
 

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  • Newborn babies.jpg
    Newborn babies.jpg
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emsr2d2

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Nothing more has been heard from the OP. Thread closed.
 
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