Do you VS Are you

Polyester

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For example, it's happening in below situation,

Tom: Are you waiting a taxi?
Mary:No!

Tom: Do you waiting a taxi?
Mary: NO!

Which one is correct as above?
 
J

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Both are incorrect.

Try again and tell us what you think.
 

Polyester

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I don't see any incorrect here.
 

GoesStation

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English structures questions in one of two ways depending on the structure of the statement the question is based on.

1. Statements with an auxiliary verb.
When you convert a statement that has an auxiliary verb into a question, you put the auxiliary verb before the subject. For example: You are coming becomes Are you coming? You will come becomes Will you come? You have eaten becomes Have you eaten?

2. Statements without an auxiliary verb.
To convert a statement that has no auxiliary verb into a question, you add the verb to do before the subject and use the bare infinitive version of the statement's verb. He walks his dog every day becomes Does he walk his dog every day? You walked the dog becomes Did you walk the dog?
 

Polyester

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Tom: Are you waiting a taxi?
Mary: Yes,I'm.

Tom: Do you wait a taxi?
Mary: NO, I don't.

Which one is correct as above?
 

GoesStation

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Tom: Are you waiting for a taxi?
Mary: Yes, I am.

We usually contract I am to I'm when to be is an auxiliary verb. We never do when it stands on its own.

The second question and answer don't work.

Can you write a natural response to this question?

Tom: Do you want a coffee?
 

Tdol

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It is indeed, but it is an unlikely exact replacement for what Polyester is trying to say, which I think is covered in GoesStation's post.
 

Polyester

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Tom: Are you waiting for a taxi?
Mary: Yes, I am.

We usually contract I am to I'm when to be is an auxiliary verb. We never do when it stands on its own.

The second question and answer don't work.

Can you write a natural response to this question?

Tom: Do you want a coffee?




Tom: Do you wait a driver? Because I will drive my own car coming to here.
Mary: Yes, I do.

Is it natural now?
 

teechar

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No, that doesn't make sense. You can't wait someone. You can wait for someone. Also, the present simple is unlikely to be the right tense here. Can you explain the context (situation) you have in mind please?
 

Matthew Wai

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The OP often misuses the simple present, and post #8 shows the simple present refers to a repeated action, which is unlikely to fit the context in this thread.
 

GoesStation

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We usually contract I am to I'm when to be is an auxiliary verb. We never do when it stands on its own.
Let me amend that statement for clarity. We don't contract conjugated forms of verbs when they end a sentence.

For example, I'm thirsty is natural; the short answer to Who's thirsty? is either I am or I'm not.
 
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Polyester

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No, that doesn't make sense. You can't wait someone. You can wait for someone. Also, the present simple is unlikely to be the right tense here. Can you explain the context (situation) you have in mind please?




Tom: Did you wait for a driver?
Mary: Yes, I did.

Is it okay?
 

GoesStation

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Tom: Did you wait for a driver?
Mary: Yes, I did.

Is it okay?

Yes! Well done. You constructed both the question and the answer correctly.
 

Matthew Wai

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Tom: Do you wait a driver? Because I will drive my own car coming to here.
When I read the above, I thought of the following:
Do you need a ride? I will drive to where you are.
 
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