does it not/doesn't it

GeneD

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Does it not irritate British English speakers when their compatriots use American English vocabulary or spelling?
Doesn't it irritate British English speakers when their compatriots use American English vocabulary or spelling?

Do the sentences above mean the same? And what exactly do they mean? I mean is there any hint of self-assurance in the way the questions are asked?

I wrote a similar sentence in another thread, but I'm not sure about the sense it conveys.
 
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Charlie Bernstein

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Does it not irritate British English speakers when their compatriots use (delete "the") American English vocabulary or spelling?
Doesn't it irritate British English speakers when their compatriots use
(delete "the") American English vocabulary or spelling?

Do the sentences above mean the same? Yes.

And what exactly do they mean?

They're asking whether it bothers Britons when other Britons use American English.

I mean is there any hint of self-assurance in the way the questions are asked?

No. It's hard to sound self-assured when you're asking a question. A statement would sound more self-assured.

I wrote a similar sentence in another thread, but I'm not sure about the sense it conveys.

To my American ears, the first sounds snooty and pedantic, and the second sounds natural.

I hope that helps!
 

GoesStation

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Beginning with doesn't it or does it not is a way to say that you suspect it does, whatever "it" may be. If that's what you mean by "self-assurance" than the answer to your third question is yes.
 

GeneD

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Beginning with doesn't it or does it not is a way to say that you suspect it does, whatever "it" may be. If that's what you mean by "self-assurance" than the answer to your third question is yes.
Yes, that's what I meant! But could it also mean that I'm not only suspicious (which is true), but as if I were sure about this and asked it as a rhetorical question?

This wasn't a rhetorical question when I asked it in the adjacent thread, of course, and I wouldn't like to sound as if it were. That's, by the way, why I used the structure from example #1. It didn't look to me the way I've described above, for some reason. Ha-ha! I didn't know that was just a super-formal variation! :-D
 
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TheParser

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NOT A TEACHER



Hello,

I am not replying to your specific question.

I thought, however, that the following information might interest you.


1. "We use the full form [i.e., no contraction] in formal questions or when we require special emphasis to express anger, surprise, etc."

a. "Have I not asked you again and again to be here on time?"

2. We also use the full form "in rhetorical questions not requiring an answer."

a. "Are there not more than enough weapons of destruction on earth?"


Source: 1988 edition of Longman English Grammar by L.G. Alexander, page 255.
 

GeneD

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2. We also use the full form "in rhetorical questions not requiring an answer."
Hello and thank you.
So it turns out that I jumped out of the frying pan right into the fire when I was trying to avoid the rhetorical meaning and used that structure, right? :)
 

vinodhabcd

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Let me be very clear here. Many people find English tough because of questions like this. Does it and doesn't it both mean the same. You can use either one. Don't confuse yourself as to which one should be used.

However generally 'doesn't it' is used instead of 'does it not' in the following cases.
1. The injury does sting, doesn't it?
2. This dog loves sleeping, doesn't it?

Note: Use whichever phrase is comfortable for you.
 

emsr2d2

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Let me be very clear here. Many people find English tough because of questions like this. "Does it" and "doesn't it​" [STRIKE]both[/STRIKE] mean the same. You can use either one. Don't confuse yourself as to which one should be used.

However generally 'doesn't it' is used instead of 'does it not' in the following cases.
1. The injury does sting, doesn't it?
2. This dog loves sleeping, doesn't it?

Note: Use whichever phrase is comfortable for you.

Welcome to the forum. :hi:

I can't agree with you that "does it" and "doesn't it" mean the same.
 

Raymott

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I assumed he typoed out 'not' in the first line, since he got it right in the second paragraph, and the discussion was never on "Does it" and "Doesn't it".
 
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