[Idiom] Duck's idiom.

Status
Not open for further replies.

diplomacy

Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2006
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Arabic
Home Country
Saudi Arabia
Current Location
Saudi Arabia
Steven Finn out for a duck.

I have read this in BBC, could you please tell me what does "a duck" mean here?
 

5jj

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
Czech Republic
Current Location
Czech Republic
If you are 'out for a duck' in cricket, you have scored no runs when you are dismissed. The expression was originally a duck's egg, the shape of the 0. (The word 'love' in tennis has a similar origin - it is the English mispronunciation of l'oeuf - the French for 'the egg').
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Diplomacy, you need to bookmark the OneLook Dictionary site.

Most of the dictionaries listed there give that meaning of 'duck'.

A batsman breaks his duck when he scores his first run, and this expression is also used figuratively.

Rover
 

BobK

Harmless drudge
Staff member
Joined
Jul 29, 2006
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
But, in his/her defence, s/he may well not have known that Steve Finn was a cricketer (one who is not infrequently out for a duck - because batting's not his job [he's a bowler]); so that definition wouldn't have seemed relevant. Of course, in an ideal world the user of a dictionary should treat all meanings as possibly relevant, but without understanding the context it's hard to separate the wheat from the chaff.

b
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top