Early start and finish time.

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tufguy

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"There is an office whose starting time is 8 AM and finishing time is 5 PM. Seniors of the office are willling to start office early on friday at 7 AM and finish it at 4 PM. Manager announces:- guys we are going to have an early log in and early log off on friday. Please be here on time."

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Skrej

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I wouldn't use 'log in/out', unless it's some kind of online job. For example, I work a second job where teams of people do log into a website in order to score tests, in which case we frequently speak of logging in/out. However, in an office setting where people are physically present, 'log in/out' doesn't work.

I'd say something like "We are going to have an early start on Friday so we can finish early."

Alternately you could say something like "We're starting and stopping early on Friday."
 

emsr2d2

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I wouldn't use "whose" with "an office" at the beginning.

There is an office where the start time is 8am and the finish time is 5pm.
 

emsr2d2

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"There is an office whose starting time is 8 AM and finishing time is 5 PM. Seniors of the office are willling to start office early on friday at 7 AM and finish it at 4 PM. Manager announces:- guys we are going to have an early log in and early log off on friday. Please be here on time."

Please check.

I would write:

There is an office where the staff start at 8am and finish at 5pm. However, the managers are willing to agree to the staff starting at 7am and finishing at 4pm on Friday. A manager announces "Guys, we are going to start and finish an hour earlier on Friday. Please be here on time, at 7am."
 

tufguy

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"Your start and finish time have been taken an hour backwards for friday."

"We are going to have an early start and finish on friday."

Please check.
 

emsr2d2

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1. "Your start and finish times have been [STRIKE]taken[/STRIKE] brought forward an hour [STRIKE]backwards[/STRIKE] for Friday."

2. "We are going to have an early start and finish on Friday."

Please check.

I have corrected sentence 1.
Sentence 2 was OK but you failed to capitalise "Friday" in both sentences.

Note that when people do something earlier than planned, we say that the time has been brought forwards. If the staff in your example were being asked to come in at 9am and finish at 6pm, their start and finish times would have been put back an hour.
 

tufguy

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"From tommorow onwards we will bring your start time forward an hour."

"We will put your finish time back an hour."
 

emsr2d2

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If they're bringing the start time forward from tomorrow, then everyone will start at 7am from now on.
If they're putting the finish time back an hour, they will finish at 5pm.

Note the correct spelling of "tomorrow".
 
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Tarheel

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I have corrected sentence 1.
Sentence 2 was OK but you failed to capitalise "Friday" in both sentences.

Note that when people do something earlier than planned, we say that the time has been brought forwards. If the staff in your example were being asked to come in at 9am and finish at 6pm, their start and finish times would have been put back an hour.

Well, it's the opposite here. For example, when we are forced to change our clocks in the spring we turn them back an hour. In the fall we move them forward an hour.
 

tufguy

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If they're bringing the start time forward from tomorrow, then everyone will start at 7am from now on.
If they're putting the finish time back an hour, they will finish at 5pm.

Note the correct spelling of "tomorrow".

Could you please tell whether my sentences are correct or not?
 

Tarheel

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No. I wouldn't use "from tomorrow" for starters. Perhaps:

We're going to start and finish one hour earlier than usual tomorrow.
 

Tarheel

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And just look at all the daylight we're saving.
 

tufguy

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No. I wouldn't use "from tomorrow" for starters. Perhaps:

We're going to start and finish one hour earlier than usual tomorrow.


Would it be correct this way?

"We will put your finish time back an hour."

"We will bring your start time forward an hour."

It is not incorrect to say "from today or tommorow onwards" in any other context. I mean to use "from" like this?
 

Tarheel

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Well, it's best to avoid any confusion. You could say you are going to move the start and finish times and then state what those times are going to be.
 

Tarheel

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You could say:

Starting tomorrow, start time is going to be XX, and quitting time is going to be YY.

(I wouldn't use "not incorrect". That might cause confusion.)
 

tufguy

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You could say:

Starting tomorrow, start time is going to be XX, and quitting time is going to be YY.

(I wouldn't use "not incorrect". That might cause confusion.)

Sorry to bother you but I am confused.

If we can say "your start time has been brought forward an hour" then why we can't say "they are going to bring our start time forward an hour" or "we will bring your start time forward an hour." I am not saying that I wil use it but I would like to know the reason. Could you please explain? You must have heard half knowledge is dangerous. I know you are giving me better options but I would like to clarify my doubt as well. Thank you.
 

emsr2d2

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You can use both the sentences you suggested.
 

tufguy

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You can use both the sentences you suggested.

Sorry, if you are angry with me. I was just asking the reason. Please don't get angry.
 
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