explicit instruction in making sentences

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keannu

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This passage seems to say that writing is one-way, needing more clarification, while oral communication is interactive and give-and-take, needing less clarification.
What does "explicit instruction " and "elaboration" each mean? The former seems "clear expressions without confusion", and the lattter "any extra explanation", but I'm not sure.
st185)The emergent literacy perspective has provided ample evidence that children use their oral language as a foundation for developing early literacy. Although written language is an extension of oral language, they are not exactly reflections of each other. Some language learners need explicit instruction in making sentences and paragraphs to connect to each other; in spelling words or in organizing ideas in writing for an imagined or a real audience. Unlike writing, oral language provides more opportunities for the listener to ask questions for clarification and to use both verbal and nonverbal context cues. However, writers must learn to express their thoughts clearly using precise and accurate language, without the benefit of elaboration to the prospective reader. This is often a major struggle for many second language writers in their early development of writing in English.
 

Raymott

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This passage seems to say that writing is one-way, needing more clarification, while oral communication is interactive and give-and-take, needing less clarification.
What does "explicit instruction " and "elaboration" each mean? The former seems "clear expressions without confusion", and the lattter "any extra explanation", but I'm not sure.
st185)The emergent literacy perspective has provided ample evidence that children use their oral language as a foundation for developing early literacy. Although written language is an extension of oral language, they are not exactly reflections of each other. Some language learners need explicit instruction in making sentences and paragraphs to connect to each other; in spelling words or in organizing ideas in writing for an imagined or a real audience. Unlike writing, oral language provides more opportunities for the listener to ask questions for clarification and to use both verbal and nonverbal context cues. However, writers must learn to express their thoughts clearly using precise and accurate language, without the benefit of elaboration to the prospective reader. This is often a major struggle for many second language writers in their early development of writing in English.
No, "explicit instruction" means what it says. While many people realise that writing has to be more clearly set out than speaking (because there's no immediate feedback), other people don't have a clue about this. Therefore, they need explicit (not merely implicit) instruction (teaching) in writing. That is, someone has to sit them down and say, "Look , when you write something, you can't just write your private thoughts as they occur to you. You have to keep your reader in mind, and try to understand whether your intentions are effectively communicated by your words. The fact that you understand what you are trying to say is no guarantee that your reader will.) That is explicit instruction.
"Elaboration" here, I think, means that when you're writing, you don't have the advantage of stopping and asking whether the reader is following. You can't elaborate on points the reader doesn't understand, because writing is not synchronous communication.
 

konungursvia

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If it's a Bachelor of Education text, or a text belonging to the academic field of education (it looks like it is, too) then 'explicit instruction' can also refer to a type of lesson structure in three parts. 1. The instructor shows the students, using examples, how something is done. 2. The instructor invites the students to take part in creating similar examples, with guidance. 3. The instructor asks the students now to try creating correct examples on their own, without additional guidance. Or, as Ray says, it may just mean 'specific procedural guidance'. My guess is the former, however, given all the education lingo.
 
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