feel different & feel differently

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Who can tell me the differences between these two phrases----"feel different" and "feel differently"?
It's better if you give me some examples. THANKS!
 

Rover_KE

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'Different' is an adjective and 'differently' an adverb.

'I had to take the tablets for a week before I felt different.'

'I disagreed with him until he had explained his reasons; then I felt differently about it.'



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LiuJing

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Who can tell me the differences between these two phrases----"feel different" and "feel differently"?
It's better if you give me some examples. THANKS!

feel different:
Your friend was very nice to you, but he is not quite nice to you today. So you might feel different, which means you realize the difference of his temperament.

feel differently:
Your friend was very nice to you, but he is not quite nice to you today. So you might feel differently, which means perhaps you have a different opinion about him.

-----------------

Not a teacher. Still want some correction from native speakers if I am wrong.
 

TheParser

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feel different:
Your friend was very nice to you, but he is not quite nice to you today. So you might feel different, which means you realize the difference of his temperament.

feel differently:
Your friend was very nice to you, but he is not quite nice to you today. So you might feel differently, which means perhaps you have a different opinion about him.

-----------------

Not a teacher. Still want some correction from native speakers if I am wrong.

********** NOT A TEACHER **********

Hello, LiuJing.

(1) May I give you my two cents(' worth)?

feel different

(a) Tom used to be my best friend. I really liked him. Then he stole

my girlfriend. Now I feel different toward him. (I dislike him.)

(b) All of the students in my class have black hair. I am the only student

with red hair. I feel so different. Everyone looks at me and laughs.

feel differently

(a) When Martha was young, she thought that every person was nice.

Then as she grew older, she discovered that there are a lot of bad people

in this world. Now she feels differently about people. She is more

cautious.

(b) [This last example is unusual. But it is possible] Mr. X was in a

terrible accident and lost his eyesight. He now feels things (with

his hands) differently from the way in which he used to feel (touch)

things.

Thank you
 

Heterological

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I agree with everything that has been written so far in this thread. However, in my experience, native speakers of American English are just awful about making this particular class of distinctions. I have an aunt who regularly expresses guilt by saying, "I feel badly..." and it always annoys me.

I'm sure you know this, but: adjectives describe nouns, and adverbs describe verbs, adjectives or other adverbs. In the sentence, "I feel _________," one should use an adjective to describe "I," for example, "I feel bad about what I said to you," or "I feel different after losing so much weight." The adverb form is only correct if it's modifying the verb "feel," as in "I feel badly now that I've lost my sense of touch," or "I feel differently toward him now that I know he's a neo-Nazi." In the adjective form, the person is bad/different/etc.; in the adverb form, the manner of feeling is bad/different/etc. A good way to test yourself is, if you think the adjective form is correct, ask whether a form of "be" can replace "feel." So, "I am bad because I said something cruel," or "I am different because I lost weight" both work. "I am bad because I've lost my sense of touch," and "I am different after finding out he's a neo-Nazi" do not work.

As I said, though, you will find many instances of people who ought to know better mixing these up, and you're not likely to confuse anyone by making such an error yourself.
 

kfredson

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********** NOT A TEACHER **********

Hello, LiuJing.

(1) May I give you my two cents(' worth)?

feel different

(a) Tom used to be my best friend. I really liked him. Then he stole

my girlfriend. Now I feel different toward him. (I dislike him.)

(b) All of the students in my class have black hair. I am the only student

with red hair. I feel so different. Everyone looks at me and laughs.

feel differently

(a) When Martha was young, she thought that every person was nice.

Then as she grew older, she discovered that there are a lot of bad people

in this world. Now she feels differently about people. She is more

cautious.

(b) [This last example is unusual. But it is possible] Mr. X was in a

terrible accident and lost his eyesight. He now feels things (with

his hands) differently from the way in which he used to feel (touch)

things.

Thank you

Thank you for the clear explication. I'm not quite sure I understand why the two (a) situations are different, however. Wouldn't "feel differently" work in the first (a) sentence, as well?

I would be grateful if you would explain your reasoning on this.
 

TheParser

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Thank you for the clear explication. I'm not quite sure I understand why the two (a) situations are different, however. Wouldn't "feel differently" work in the first (a) sentence, as well?

I would be grateful if you would explain your reasoning on this.

********** NOT A TEACHER **********

Hello, Kfredson.

(1) Thank you for your note.

(2) You are right --they do seem the same!!!

(a) The only difference is that one uses the adjective; the other,

the adverb.

(i) Maybe "feel" need only take "different," while other verbs

such as "act" would produce different meanings with "different"

and "differently."

(3) Please offer me your guidance.

Thank you
 
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