[Grammar] FETCH word is for dog usages

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wikey321

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Hi all, i have an "Interesting" question here.

I met a American English Teacher here and keep on correcting my grammar. I said " Can I fetch you from the coffee shop?" then English teacher replied that this is incorrect and "Fetch" is to command a dog like "Throw the stick and let the dog fetches it back" . I been using this sentence for decades yet i have double check here too - http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/fetch . She emphasized that this word, "fetch" is commonly use for DOG training in America.

Any native english spoken person from America can comment here? Feel free to correct my grammar above if any too :) English is not my 1st/mother tongue language. Appreciated your help much !
 

Tdol

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Fetch is used as a command to tell a dog to retrieve something. Your sentence works in British English- parents fetch the kids from school.
 

emsr2d2

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Hi all, I have an "interesting" question here.

I met an American English teacher here and ​he [STRIKE]keep[/STRIKE] kept on correcting my grammar. I said " Can I fetch you from the coffee shop?", then the English teacher [STRIKE]replied[/STRIKE] said that this is incorrect and "fetch" is used to command a dog, like in "Throw the stick and [STRIKE]let[/STRIKE] tell the dog [STRIKE]fetches[/STRIKE] to fetch it." [STRIKE]back" .[/STRIKE]

I have been using this sentence for decades [STRIKE]yet[/STRIKE] and I have double-checked here too - http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/fetch. She emphasized that this word, "fetch", is commonly use for [STRIKE]DOG[/STRIKE] dog training in America.

Can any native English [STRIKE]spoken person[/STRIKE] speaker from America [STRIKE]can[/STRIKE] comment here? Feel free to correct my grammar above if there are any mistakes. [STRIKE]too :)[/STRIKE] English is not my [STRIKE]1st/[/STRIKE] mother tongue. [STRIKE]language. [/STRIKE][STRIKE]Appreciated[/STRIKE] Your help is much appreciated!

Note my corrections above.

I'm not an AmE speaker but in BrE, we shout "Fetch!" to the dog after throwing a stick or a ball. However, it can be used in other senses but it's not common. For your "Can I fetch you from the coffee shop?", I would say "Can I pick you up from the coffee shop?" However, an Irish friend of mine uses "fetch" in that context. She would also say "Can I fetch you anything from the shop?" where I would use "Can I get you anything from the shop?"

Remember that we don't put a space before a comma, full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
 

GoesStation

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Fetch​ is common in some American dialects but most Americans would only use it as a command to a dog.
 

Barb_D

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It's native in my vocabulary (American from the northeast but with a southern parent) to use it to retrieve something, including a person.
I need to fetch Amy from the airport this afternoon.
I believe it's the southern part of my native vocabulary that finds this natural.

The American English teacher must not be from the south.
 

Skrej

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I use it infrequently as well, but it does have a sense of being an errand or command.

I might ask a child, close friend, or family member to fetch me something, but I probably wouldn't use it with strangers or colleagues.
 
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