Filler?

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Jack8rkin

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Hello everyone!

I used to work for a refinery, which was basically a plant that produced various lubricants at the time I got the job there. The refinery part of the company had been shut down due to certain political reasons.

My job was to fill 18-liter tin cans with hydraulic and other sorts of oil. Then we packed them in pairs in wooden crates.

Basically, I took the oil from a certain storage tank and used a pump to move this liquid to a certain filling stand (I would not call it a machine -- it was not motorized -- it was a dosing tool on a stand or something like that) where I filled tin cans with oil.

I understand there is no such job any more in the US. It's usually an operator of a certain machine.

Well, could you help me to translate the name of my job into English.
In Russian it is 'слищик-разливщик'.
Directly translated, it would be 'drainer-filler'. Is it acceptable at all?

Any ideas?

Thank you.
 

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Raymott

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'Drainer filler' would mean nothing to me. Why not call yourself a 'refinery worker' and expand on that if anyone is interested?
Or, in the spirit of making your job sound more glamorous, you're an "oil transfer technician".
 

Jack8rkin

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Thank you.
It's for a U.S. visa that I need a more or less accurate translation. I found in "Classified index of occupations. Fifteenth Census of the United States" for 1930 several jobs called 'filler' which relate to the 'Oil Refinery' section and 'Paint and Varnish Factories' section (it's 'can filler' there, and also 'can solderer', which is what I also did in the past -- soldered the mouths of the cans. By the way, you can see a can in the attahced picture). Keep in mind the book is dated 1930. I do not believe that now there is such a job 'filler' in the U.S. Nevertherless, there is such a job in Russia.

Can anyone tell me what exactly was the "filler's" job?
 

SoothingDave

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The people reading your visa application are not going to know what a "filler" is. Use "refinery worker," as suggested above.
 

emsr2d2

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Unless you're applying for a working visa in the US, in which case I imagine it's important for them to know exactly what you did so they can decide if you qualify for the job in the US, it's going to be of little relevance. Stick with "refinery worker".
 

Jack8rkin

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Thank you guys a ton!

It's not going to be a working visa. It's for three days only, but still I have to fill out a form for that.
 

5jj

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It's not going to be a working visa. It's for three days only, but still I have to fill out a form for that.
In that case definitely follow the advice given by Raymott and ems - refinery worker.
 

emsr2d2

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I think enough is enough with this one. It appears to be dealt with and the OP accepts our suggestions. Thread closed.
 
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