fruit trees names ("apple tree", "cherry tree" and so on)

GeneD

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What is the common way to call fruit trees? Do you just add the word "tree" to a fruit (apple+tree=apple tree), or are they called somewhat else?
"Cherry" (fruit) - "cherry tree" or just "cherry"?
"Orange", "mandarin", "pear", "plum", "peach" (and so on)... Do they have the same pattern of how the words for their trees are formed? And is there the pattern?
 

Rover_KE

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... with the exception of fruits that grow on bushes: gooseberries, blackberries, blackcurrants etc.
 

GeneD

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... with the exception of fruits that grow on bushes: gooseberries, blackberries, blackcurrants etc.
Do you say gooseberry bush, blackcurrant bush when talking about the whole plant, not only berries? Or do you use gooseberry for a gooseberry bush (as we say in Russian, for instance)?
 
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GoesStation

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Some vines also produce fruit, notably grapevines. Note that grapevine is a single word.
 
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Tdol

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Or do you use gooseberry for a gooseberry bush (as we say in Russian, for instance)?

I wouldn't. I would use gooseberry for the fruit.
 

GoesStation

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This is off topic, but "play gooseberry" is used to refer to a person who is in the company (presence) of two other people who would rather not have him/her there.
That's "being a third wheel" in American English.
 

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And strawberries grow on the ground. It's a strawberry plant.
 

GeneD

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And strawberries grow on the ground. It's a strawberry plant.
Do blueberries and cowberries grow on blueberry and cowberry plants?
 
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GoesStation

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Blueberries grow on blueberry bushes. I'm not familiar with cowberries, but if the plant has woody, free-standing stems that hold the foliage and fruit above the ground, it's a bush.
 

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Unless it is very clear from the context that we are talking about bushes, we use the word bush after the name of the fruit. I recommend that learners always use it.

You'll sometimes hear the more generic term 'plant' substituted for 'bush', but Piscean's comment still applies.
 

Skrej

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I'm not familiar with cowberries

I've never heard the term either, but Google suggests they're also known as lingonberries, which I have heard of.
 

GeneD

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I've never heard the term either, but Google suggests they're also known as lingonberries, which I have heard of.

I found the term "cowberry" in the following Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaccinium_vitis-idaea. Since the main term is Latin there, I simply chose one of the three English names (given in brackets) not actually knowing which one is more common. Is "lingonberry" a more common name?
 

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Is "lingonberries" a more common name?
Those of us who have eaten at an Ikea cafeteria will have seen that term and probably tasted the fruit. The Wikipedia article describes the plant as a short shrub. We'd call them bushes​ here; we generally reserve the word "shrub" for a decorative planting of bushes around a house.
 

GeneD

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I've just tried to check all the three names from the Wikipedia (lingonberry, partridgeberry and cowberry) and haven't found them in the Macmillan Dictionary. These berries don't seem to be very popular in the English speaking world, are they? :)
 

GeneD

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I continued to read the article and found this: "There are at least 25 other common English names of Vaccinium vitis-idaea worldwide". Well, it's no wonder that some of you haven't heard the term "cowberry".

 

GoesStation

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I'm pretty sure I'd heard of lingonberries before seeing products made from them at Ikea, but they aren't widely known in the United States.
 

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Lingonberries (also known as cowberries) can be found in Scandinavia.
 

GeneD

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Lingonberries (also known as cowberries) can be found in Scandinavia.
According to the Wikipedia, they can be found " throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Eurasia to North America". In fact, they also grow in the forest near the town I live. But they aren't very popular here either (at least, not as popular as blueberries are).
 

emsr2d2

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I have only ever seen lingonberry products at Ikea.
 
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