[Grammar] Her Majesty's say

gaetano

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Let's see what will Her Majesty's say be.
or
Let's see what will be Her Majesty's say.

Which form is more correct? Thank you
 
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emsr2d2

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Re: which is better?

Neither. "Her Majesty", an official title for a queen, can be replaced by "she".

Let's see what Her Majesty say​s.
 

GoesStation

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Re: which is better?

You can say ​Let's see what Her Majesty says.
 

emsr2d2

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Re: which is better?

I'm pretty sure that's what I wrote in post #2, 35 minutes earlier! ;-)
 

Rover_KE

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gaetano, please note that I have changed your thread title.

Extract from the forum's Posting Guidelines:

Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.
 
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emsr2d2

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In your original sentences, you seem to have tried to use "say" as a noun. It's not. It's a verb.
 

GoesStation

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In your original sentences, you seem to have tried to use "say" as a noun. It's not. It's a verb.
It's a noun in the expression "to have one's say". For example, The Queen has had her say. A learner may want to be able to recognize this expression but shouldn't try to use it.

Of course, when the Queen is a Windsor, she never has her say except in private. :)
 

gaetano

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Thank you all. But nobody seem to answer my question. I've been finding say as a noun long since in colloquial English, and in the newspapers. Such was the case with the Queen's say, about the recent announcement of Prince Harry's appointment to Captain General, Royal Marines. An appointment Prince Philip is going to stand down from. Further, I've been studying English for over 65 years; I still consider myself a learner, but I can't see why I couldn't use the expression if it does make sense in Eglish. If this worries you, let's replace "say" with "decision". My question remains. Thank you for your attention
 

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"Let's see what will Her Majesty's say be."
or
"Let's see what will be Her Majesty's say."

Which form is more correct? Thank you

I've been finding "say" as a noun long since in colloquial English, and in the newspapers. "Such was the case with the Queen's say, about the recent announcement of Prince Harry's appointment to Captain General, Royal Marines. An appointment Prince Philip is going to stand down from." Further, I've been studying English for over 65 years; I still consider myself a learner, but I can't see why I couldn't use the expression if it does make sense in English. If this worries you, let's replace "say" with "decision". My question remains.

Neither of your original sentences was natural. "Decision" is a better choice, but you'll have to rephrase the sentence even with the substitution. You could say "Let's wait for Her Majesty's decision." [EDIT] I just thought of a way to use "say": Let's wait till Her Majesty has her say.

Remember to surround quoted text, and other text you're discussing, in quotation marks or to set it in italics.
 

gaetano

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Very sensible suggestion. Thank you. But, just in case I would sound unnatural, which sentence could I be using:
"Let's wait what will be Her Majesty's decision", or
"Let's wait what H.M.'s decision will be"?
 

GoesStation

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But, just in case I would sound unnatural, which sentence could I be using:
"Let's wait what will be Her Majesty's decision", or
"Let's wait what H.M.'s decision will be"?
They are both unnatural. Here's another natural (but very formal) variation I just thought of: "Let's await Her Majesty's decision."
 

jutfrank

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Let's wait and see what Her Majesty's decision is.
 

GoesStation

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Or simply "Let's wait for Her Majesty's decision."

Personally, I'm getting tired of waiting. Her Majesty's a pretty nice girl, but she doesn't have a lot to say.
 

jutfrank

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We might be waiting a while. Her Maj doesn't make many decisions.
 

GoesStation

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We might be waiting a while. Her Maj doesn't make many decisions.
Not, as I mentioned above, if she's a Windsor. It just wouldn't do. Other Majesties may be less retiring.
 

emsr2d2

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Her "decision" might not be appropriate.
 

gaetano

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Thankyou again, Gentlemen, but we were not discussing HM's right or willingness to express a decision. We were discussing the grammar underlying my two sentences. I understand they are both considered unnatural. But can any of the two be considered less unnatural, and grammatically more correct, than the other? Of course in a colloquial atmosphere. Thanks
 

Tdol

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It's a noun in the expression "to have one's say". For example, The Queen has had her say.

You could also say that something can only be done on/upon her say, though I haven't seen or heard this used for a long time.
 

GoesStation

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Neither of your two sentences (Let's see what will Her Majesty's say be. Let's see what will be Her Majesty's say.) is acceptable/natural/grammatical in any atmosphere.
Furthermore, neither of them is less unnatural or more acceptable than the other. They are both simply wrong.

Does that answer OP's question?
 

gaetano

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Thank you Piscean for the whole message. I apologize for the inconsiderate use of Gentlemen. It was just the kind of answer I'd been waiting for. To know whether either of the two sentences could be considered as grammatically correct. Now I know. Many thanks again.
 
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