How many hours gap is there between these two journeys?

Status
Not open for further replies.

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
If I get to Manhattan and back every day from Florid it will take me 3:30 to 4 hours but if I get to California and back from Florida it will take me 2:00 to 2:30 hours. How many hours gap is there between these two journeys?

If I commute daily from Florida to Manhattan (is it correct to specify the name of the destination?) it will take me 3:30 to 4 hours but if I commute to California from Florida it will take me 2:00 to 2:30 hours. How many hours gap is there between these two journeys?


Please check my sentences.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I don't understand what you mean by hours gap.

Please come up with a question that someone might really ask. Nobody commutes from the New York City borough of Manhattan to anywhere in the state of Florida, nor from Manhattan, Kansas, nor from any other place called Manhattan.
 

Tarheel

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Also, nobody would say to Manhattan from Florida. It's possible they would say to New York from Miami (for example). However, more likely is from Miami to New York.
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
I don't understand what you mean by hours gap.

Please come up with a question that someone might really ask. Nobody commutes from the New York City borough of Manhattan to anywhere in the state of Florida, nor from Manhattan, Kansas, nor from any other place called Manhattan.

I am not aware of the geographical location of these cities. I am just using their names for examples.
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Also, nobody would say to Manhattan from Florida. It's possible they would say to New York from Miami (for example). However, more likely is from Miami to New York.

If I get to Miami and back every day from New York it will take me 3:30 to 4 hours but if I get to California and back from Florida it will take me 2:00 to 2:30 hours. How many hours gap is there between these two journeys?

If I commute daily from Miami to New York (is it correct to specify the name of the destination?) it will take me 3:30 to 4 hours but if I commute to California from Florida it will take me 2:00 to 2:30 hours. How many hours gap is there between these two journeys?
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
I don't understand what you mean by hours gap.

Please come up with a question that someone might really ask. Nobody commutes from the New York City borough of Manhattan to anywhere in the state of Florida, nor from Manhattan, Kansas, nor from any other place called Manhattan.

I need to say it in real that is why I am asking you.

"Hours gap" means the difference of time. Going from first place (Miami) to second (New York) takes 4:00 hours and going from third place to fourth takes 2:00 hours of time. So, the gap is of two hours between both journeys.
 

Tarheel

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Say:

If I go from New York to Miami every day it will take three and a half to four hours travel time.

There is no such thing as a trip from Florida to California. Also, it's a math question, not a language question. (It's simple subtraction.)
 

Tarheel

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Not only is it correct to specify the destination, it is necessary.
 

Tarheel

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I need to say it in real that is why I am asking you.

"Hours gap" means the difference of time. Going from first place (Miami) to second (New York) takes 4:00 hours and going from third place to fourth takes 2:00 hours of time. So, the gap is of two hours between both journeys.

OK. A more natural way to say it might be:

What's the difference in time?
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
OK. A more natural way to say it might be:

What's the difference in time?

If I get to Miami and back every day from New York it will take me 3:30 to 4 hours but if I get to California and back from Florida it will take me 2:00 to 2:30 hours. What is the difference between these two journeys?

If I commute daily from Miami to New York (is it correct to specify the name of the destination?) it will take me 3:30 to 4 hours but if I commute to California from Florida it will take me 2:00 to 2:30 hours. What is the difference between these two journeys?


Could you please check my sentences? I mean the first part and the last "If I get to Miami and back every day from New York" and "What is the difference between these two journeys?"
 

Tarheel

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I think the OP means 'going from New York to Miami and coming back' according to the following:

I got that. I just forgot to put it in the sentence. In any case, if he goes from New York to Miami every day he also has to come back every day. (What an unlikely commute!)
 

Tarheel

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2014
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
If I get to Miami and back every day from New York it will take me 3:30 to 4 hours but if I get to California and back from Florida it will take me 2:00 to 2:30 hours. What is the difference between these two journeys?

If I commute daily from Miami to New York (is it correct to specify the name of the destination?) it will take me 3:30 to 4 hours but if I commute to California from Florida it will take me 2:00 to 2:30 hours. What is the difference between these two journeys?


Could you please check my sentences? I mean the first part and the last "If I get to Miami and back every day from New York" and "What is the difference between these two journeys?"

I already explained that to you. Did you read my previous posts? As for the third paragraph, say:

If I go from New York to Miami and back every day....

What is the difference? On the one hand, you're going from New York to Miami. On the other hand, you're going from Miami to New York.
:-?
 

Matthew Wai

VIP Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2013
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Chinese
Home Country
China
Current Location
China
I guess the OP does not know 'get to' means 'arrive at' rather than 'travel to'.
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
I got that. I just forgot to put it in the sentence. In any case, if he goes from New York to Miami every day he also has to come back every day. (What an unlikely commute!)

If I go to Miami from New York and come back it will take me three to four hours of travel time but if I go to California from Florida it will take me two to three hours. What is the difference in time (between these travel time)?

If I commute from Miami to New York it will take me three to four hours but if I commute to California from Florida it will take me two to three hours. What is the difference in time (between the travel time)?

Can we say "how many hours difference is there between these two journeys (I don't know what to write instead of journey here)"?

Can we say "between these travel times"?
 
Last edited:

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Why don't you stick to the more natural and much simpler pattern I suggested in post 9, tufguy?

Your sentences above are now, with my corrections, OK , but are unnecessarily wordy. They are also questions no native speaker would ask. Even thoose of us who are not very good at mental arithmetic can do very simple subtraction.

Actually I wanted to know this because I was talking to my friend regarding this.

How much longer does it take to fly from London to Istanbul than (from London) to Prague? Is this the only question you would ask?

How much longer does it take to go New York from Miami than (from Miami) to Michigan?
 

Rover_KE

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
You have asked those questions in a new thread so I'm closing this.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top