I don't want to lose you, too/either?

arako311

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I heard this line from a series, and the protagonist used "I don't want to lose you, too."

Here's the full script:
Mr. Gold: No. You’re going to go back to the library, lock the door, and wait for me to dispense with this problem!
Belle: And, if I don’t? You’ll… You’ll cast some spell that gives me no choice?
Mr. Gold: No. I trust you’ll do as I wish, as you trust me to be a better man. Belle, please. Hook has maybe cost me the chance of finding my son. I don’t want to lose you, too. Here, look. I want you to take this.


I thought the grammar book says "either" is used for negative sentences, whereas "too" for positive.
Why isn't it "I don't want to lose you, either." as in "I have never been here, either."?
I'm so confused.
 
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emsr2d2

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What precedes it?
 

GoesStation

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Either is the typical way to express this. The character's choice of "too" emphasizes his or her agreement.
 

arako311

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Thank you, everyone, for your kind help.:-D
I've added the original script to give the full context.
After reading your replies, I assume whether a sentence is positive or negative could not simply be judged by its grammatical features, but should consider its semantic connotations as well, right??
 

emsr2d2

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The preceding sentence suggests that Mr Gold has lost his son so it makes sense for him to say to Belle "I don't want to lose you too". It means "I don't want to lose you in addition to having already lost my son".

"I don't want to lose you either" would only work if Belle had just said to Mr Gold "I don't want to lose you".
 

arako311

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The preceding sentence suggests that Mr Gold has lost his son so it makes sense for him to say to Belle "I don't want to lose you too". It means "I don't want to lose you in addition to having already lost my son".

"I don't want to lose you either" would only work if Belle had just said to Mr Gold "I don't want to lose you".

Hi,

Is it like "I have already lost my son, and I don't want to lose you, too"?
Since "I have already lost my son" doesn't include any negation words, the following sentence thus goes with "too".
Thank you for your explanations.

Best
 

GoesStation

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Thank you, everyone, for your kind help.:-D
I've added the original script to give the full context.
After reading your replies, I assume whether a sentence is positive or negative could not simply be judged by its grammatical features, but should consider its semantic connotations as well, right??

Either your original post omitted the comma or I didn't notice it. The comma changes the meaning: too means "also", not either.
 

GoesStation

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